'The Little Drummer Girl' star Florence Pugh is already awaiting the second season to find out more about her character Charlie

While the show has barely had its first episode on BBC, Pugh is already imagining what more could happen with her character.


                            'The Little Drummer Girl' star Florence Pugh is already awaiting the second season to find out more about her character Charlie

Florence Pugh thinks that it is her character's simplicity in 'The Little Drummer Girl' that makes her so authentic. The BBC's second adaptation of a John Le Carre novel (the first being producer ‎Rob Bullock's adaptation of Carre's 1993 novel, 'The Night Manager') follows the story of a girl who suddenly finds herself in the place of a spy instead of being an actress that she had aspired to be. 

The six-part drama follows Charlie (played by Pugh) who has set off to Greece to pursue her career as an actress when she was asked for an impromptu performance of a stage version of Shakespeare's 'As You Like It'. However, Charlie finds herself in a trap when she is compelled to act as a double agent for the Israeli spy, Marty Kurtz (played by Michael Shannon) who is plotting to kill a Palestinian terrorist. Amid all of this, Charlie is quickly moved to Athens by an alluring stranger (played by Alexander Skarsgard), where she works with shadow puppets on a deserted Acropolis and ultimately falls in love. 

Charlie finds herself amid an evolving spy game. (IMDb)
Charlie finds herself amid an evolving spy game. (IMDb)

Although we have barely watched the second episode of the series, as the first episode already premiered on October 28 at 9 p.m., Pugh seems to be already up for the idea of a second season. 'The Falling' actress told Metro News that she would love to work for a second season as there is so much about Charlie that she would love to find out. "I would love it if she grew and if we followed her again because she’s such an interesting character and by the end of the series she’s been through so much, and she’s dealt with so much for a normal person. I would love to see what happens next."

 



 

 

While she clearly does not think that "this is the end for Charlie", Pugh mentioned that the author of the novel, Carre is "a very particular man". Describing an interactive session with him, she explained, "I met him at the end of the shoot and I didn’t meet him beforehand, so anything he thought was a bit too late because I’d already done the series. He’s a very particular man; he wrote all these characters and these books and obviously, there are going to be so many things that aren’t the way he imagined. I’m sure if I wrote anything and someone played it, I’d think, 'That’s totally wrong. Stop immediately, put it down.' But he loved seeing these characters become what they are."

Pugh mentioned that Carre is particular about how his characters are being executed. (Getty Images)
Pugh mentioned that Carre is particular about how his characters are being executed. (Getty Images)

While females characters are increasingly making it to the frontline with shows  like 'Killing Eve', 'Doctor Who' and 'The Sinner', the one thing that sets Charlie apart as a character is her sheer simplicity, and Pugh rightfully pointed out that in spite of being sought after, Charlie is rooted in her cause. Speaking of her character, Pugh mentioned, "She wasn’t a superhero and she wasn’t particularly amazing at anything other than she was just really good at acting. She is gobby, she is fierce, she is very intelligent and funny and she has a brilliant ability to manipulate a situation in the way that she wants – but those are her qualities, which I think that the moment we’re so used to female characters being so great – and that’s amazing – but what’s so fantastic about Charlie is that she’s very normal."

Probably the one thing that sets Charlie apart is her simplicity. (IMDb)
Probably the one thing that sets Charlie apart is her simplicity. (IMDb)

Pugh's statement clearly suggests why she was director Park Chan Wook's first choice for the show which had apparently banned from executing scenes involving "boobs and bums" as "America is scared of it". Pugh had revealed to RadioTimes that sex scenes were muted down because "America is quite scared of bums and nipples. There was one scene we did where Alex [Skarsgaard] and I were under the duvet and supposedly naked. I was wriggling down one end and Alex is wriggling down the other." However, Park would time and again call out the cuts asking Pugh to hide her skin sufficiently. 

'The Little Drummer Girl' returns on November 4 to BBC at 9 p.m.