"Jane Fonda in Five Acts": HBO releases trailer for new documentary on actress' life

The film had debuted at the Sundance Film Festival this year and garnered rave reviews well in advance of its September 24 premiere on the network. 


                            "Jane Fonda in Five Acts": HBO releases trailer for new documentary on actress' life

HBO has finally released the new trailer for their upcoming documentary - 'Jane Fonda in Five Acts' - to be directed by Susan Lacy and it's every bit as thrilling as the life and works of the titular actress, focussing much on her activism and even the controversies surrounding her too. The film had debuted at the Sundance Film Festival this year and garnered rave reviews well in advance of its September 24 premiere on the network. 

The documentary draws on 21 hours of interviews with Fonda, who speaks candidly and frankly about her life and her missteps. She explores the pain of her mother's suicide, her father’s emotional unavailability, 30 years of an eating disorder and three marriages to highly visible, yet diametrically opposed men.

Jane Fonda at the Savoy Hotel, London in 1965. (Photo by Kaye/Express/Getty Images)
Jane Fonda at the Savoy Hotel, London in 1965. (Photo by Kaye/Express/Getty Images)

The documentary is also going to include interviews with family and friends -- Robert Redford, Lily Tomlin, producer Paula Weinstein and former spouses Tom Hayden and Ted Turner -- as well as rare home movies and verité footage of the 80-year-old Fonda’s busy life today at, as she puts it, “the beginning of my last act.”

The trailer of the documentary opens with Fonda being introduced as "one of Hollywood's most exciting new stars" over decades ago. It's followed by another reporter sharing how Fonda has received her own share of hostility, due to her vehement activism.

"This is the beginning of my last act," Fonda's voice booms through a voiceover. "In order to know how to go forward, I'm gonna have to know where I've been." She also addresses her early acting career, saying: "I wanted to please Dad. I never felt real. I just thought, 'I gotta find who I really am.'"

Of her activism, especially that against the Vietnam War, she says: "I'm proud of most of what I did, and I'm very sorry for some of what I did," she says.

The trailer shows her addressing her three marriages, to Roger Vadim, Tom Hayden, and Ted Turner. She shares that "none of my marriages were democratic because I had to be a certain way. I had to look a certain way." In the end, as a montage of clips throughout her extensive career plays out, she says: "It took me a really long time to find my own narrative. But I am what I am."