DaBaby slammed for urging women to UNDRESS at controversial pre-Grammys show

Most women in the audience ignored the 30-year-old chart-topper, but many of them seemed offended by his inappropriate request


                            DaBaby slammed for urging women to UNDRESS at controversial pre-Grammys show
DaBaby (Rich Fury/Getty Images)
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It seems DaBaby hasn't learned anything from the severe backlash he received last year for his homophobic comments. The rapper has waded into controversy again by urging women at a pre-Grammys show to take off their clothes, leaving many of them offended.

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According to Variety, while performing at Drai’s Beachclub & Nightclub in Las Vegas on Saturday, April 2, the rapper said, "I don't discriminate", before asking them, multiple times, to undress. "Pull your t--ties out if you love DaBaby."

Most of the women in the audience reportedly ignored the 30-year-old chart-topper, whose real name is Jonathan Lyndale Kirk, but many of them seemed offended by his inappropriate request.

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This is not the first time DaBaby has done something like this. In July last year, while performing at Rolling Loud Miami, he fired insults at women as well as the LGBTQ+ community. He had said: “[If] you didn't show up today with HIV/AIDS or any of them deadly sexually transmitted diseases that'll make you die in two to three weeks, then put a cellphone light in the air.”

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Rapper DaBaby performs onstage during "Rolling Loud Presents: DaBaby Live Show Killa" tour at Coca-Cola Roxy on December 04, 2021, in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images)

He then added: “Fellas, if you ain't suck a n---a dick in the parking lot, put your cellphone light up.” However, after being blasted online for his rudeness, the ‘Red Light Green Light’ singer issued a statement that read: “Anybody who done ever been effected by AIDS/HIV y'all got the right to be upset, what I said was insensitive even though I have no intentions on offending anybody. So my apologies But the LGBT community... I ain't trippin on y'all, do you. y'all business is y'all business.”

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But his apology did not work out in his favor as a critic tweeted: “This is such a backhanded ‘apology’ lmao.” The second one wrote: “Yea dude,it was ignorant af ,some people were born that way,but thank you for being accountable,you learn something every day.” “He’s not accountable he just want to stop the back clash it’s a «  i said sorry now shut up »,” the third one added.

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DaBaby performs on stage during Rolling Loud at Hard Rock Stadium on July 25, 2021, in Miami Gardens, Florida. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images)

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At the time, Dua Lipa had also called him out by saying: “I'm surprised and horrified at DaBaby's comments. I really don't recognize this as the person I worked with. I know my fans know where my heart lies and that I stand 100% with the LGTBQ community. We need to come together to fight the stigma and ignorance around HIV/AIDS.”

Besides this year in March, HIV and LGBTQ advocates slammed Rolling Loud as well as the ‘Under the Sun’ singer after he was invited to return to Miami music festival — months after making the demeaning statement. Deondre B. Moore, director of U.S. partnerships and community engagement at the Prevention Access Campaign, said: “It feels as though the meeting and taking time to meet with us was all just smoke and mirrors. None of the things that he talked about doing or following through with have come to fruition.”

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Rapper DaBaby performs onstage during "Rolling Loud Presents: DaBaby Live Show Killa" tour at Coca-Cola Roxy on December 04, 2021, in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images)

Moore added: “For us, it’s kind of a slap in the face … to see them still being able to support and push him up to be on the same stage where he made such horrible comments and degrading comments for people living with HIV. He also talked about working with some of us and our organizations at his concerts to provide testing or raise awareness and make sure that the education was put out there correctly, and then none of that has happened as well.”

Ian L. Haddock, executive director of the Normal Anomaly Initiative, mentioned: “It was like literally radio silence. So to hear that he is back on the lineup after not having done anything, it’s really just a testament to capitalism and it’s a testament to people not understanding the weight of his words.”

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