'The Terror: Infamy' season finale deals with the aftermath of the Hiroshima bombing with golden lanterns paving way for the future

The way the episode parallels the Americans' joy at bombing Japan with the Japanese community's horror of what's to become of them is haunting


                            'The Terror: Infamy' season finale deals with the aftermath of the Hiroshima bombing with golden lanterns paving way for the future

This article contains spoilers for Episode 10

As the second season of 'The Terror' titled 'Infamy' comes to a wrap with its 10th episode 'Into the Afterlife', a fresh bout of horror shrouds the entirety of the Japanese-American community on Terminal Island.

One would think the end of the war would be a joyous occasion, and it is, with Americans exploding firecrackers and hugging one another in celebration.

The Japanese, on the other hand, are reeling under shockwaves of the horror that just dropped back home with the bombing of Hiroshima, posing a direct threat to the entire community living in America.

While Yamato-san envisions the horrors of the attack in his dreams, Chester, in his quest to save Luz and the baby, runs the risk of being targeted purely for his heritage.

And this is what makes the season finale terrifying, even for those who weren't directly related to people who suffered the impact of the Second World War.

The way the episode parallels the Americans' joy bombing Japan with the Japanese community's horror of what's to become of them is haunting, and we have George Takei's exceptional portrayal of Yamato-san to thank for that.

The ever so stoic man finally exhibits fear when he sees in his dream a friend who has possibly passed away along with his entire family, in the wake of the attack, and Yamato's expressions speak volumes for the fear, agony, and regret he feels about those back home.

Like he tells Amy later in the episode, he has cried more tears after returning from the internment camps, than he had at the camps where they were lodged at and treated with inhumane bias.

However, while Yamato-san comforts Amy about her guilt over killing the villainous Major Bowen, convincing her that she acted out in self-defense, Chester's narrative is a long way from comfort.

As Yuko keeps possessing one person after the other, and kills along her way to a deserted barn, with Chester and Luz's newborn child, the story turns darker with Yuko leaving behind mementos symbolizing childhood — like folded baby blankets and a toy-bear in places where she was last present with the baby she now claims is hers.



 

Amidst Luz's traumatized paranoia out of the fear of losing a third child, and Asako telling Henry why Yuko is a Yurei back to seek vengeance on the Nakayamas, the only lighthearted moment on the episode is when Henry opens up to Chester about the first time they brought him home.

After weeks of resentment and a strained relationship with Chester lashing out after knowing the truth behind his birth, and Henry rigidly maintaining his stance, trying to draft distance between himself and his adopted son, these moments arrive as a much needed silver lining.

Henry speaks about a certain calmness that took over him the day they adopted Chester and those are the first whiffs of open wounds healing — something that resonates with Amy and Yamato san attempting to assimilate life and functionality back in Terminal Island.

With Chester's parents joining forces to defeat Yuko one final time, it is a parent's love for their child that overcomes the vengeful evil that had haunted them for years on end.

Things work out in the end, with a flash-forward to a future where Chester and Luz are a happy family with a son and twin daughters.

The community comes together to commemorate their fallen heroes as lanterns galore their lake with pretty lights signifying the peace that has finally been restored in their community that had been through one of the most shameful terrors that sadly still doesn't get addressed enough. 

'The Terror: Infamy' finale aired on Monday at 9 pm only on AMC.

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