Peter Verzilov of Pussy Riot out of hospital after recovering from poisoning

Pussy Riot confirmed last week that Verzilov was indeed poisoned after he was moved to a German hopital from Russia. The band suggests thta the Kremlin is behind the act.


                            Peter Verzilov of Pussy Riot out of hospital after recovering from poisoning

After confirming last week that fellow member Peter Verzilov was indeed poisoned, the protest punk group Pussy Riot have now confirmed that Verzilov has been discharged from the hospital in Germany where he was receiving treatment.

“Peter feels great, and they're kicking him out of the hospital,” Pussy Riot wrote on Twitter. A representative for the collective confirmed to Pitchfork that Verzilov left the hospital on Wednesday.

German doctors confirmed last week that Verzilov had been poisoned in Moscow, where he’d been hospitalized on September 12 after showing symptoms that included loss of sight, speech, motor skills, and memory the day before.  While doctors said that it was "highly plausible" he was poisoned, they stressed that they can't say how this might have occurred or who was responsible.

The statement is understandable as political tensions are high after Pussy Riot accused the Kremlin of being behind the poisoning. The collective has been at loggerheads with the Russian government for a while now, with the clash reaching its peak when two of the members were imprisoned after their performance inside Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior in February 2012.

 



 

A week after the poisoning, Verzilov was still suffering from amnesia, dizziness, and confusion, Pussy Riot revealed at the time. “It’s important to realize that Peter’s life was in danger,” they said.

The Charite hospital said Pyotr Verzilov -- who was one of the four Pussy Riot members arrested for rushing the field during the 2018 FIFA World Cup -- is no longer showing the symptoms of disorientation that he had when he arrived in mid-September after his initial treatment in Moscow. It said there's still an issue with the reaction of his pupils, but doctors are confident that will disappear.

Dr. Kai-Uwe Eckardt said the diagnosis of an anticholinergic syndrome hasn't changed, and "an intake or absorption of an exogenous substance as the cause of this syndrome still appears to be the most plausible explanation for his acute illness on Sept. 11."

Charite's chairman, Dr. Karl Max Einhaeupl, added that tests so far haven't produced any clear indication of a specific substance that might have caused his illness. He said the Berlin hospital remains in contact with its Moscow counterparts to get more information on Verzilov's initial treatment.