Now PETA raises concerns about Prince William's 'drugged' horse, saying it may have been injured

PETA suspects Prince William's horse George was drugged as his head was lowered during the rehearsal


                            Now PETA raises concerns about Prince William's 'drugged' horse, saying it may have been injured
PETA fears Prince William's horse was drugged (Jane Barlow/Getty Images)
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People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) wants horses out of the Trooping the Color parade, calling it a risk for both the animal and the public. The American animal rights organization with nine million global supporters spotted something fishy during the rehearsal of the Queen's birthday parade. They said Prince William's horse could have been lowering its head during the Trooping the Color rehearsal as it was injured. Military veterans claim the horse looked 'drugged'.

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The 39-year-old Duke of Cambridge rode a black Household Division charger called George. He was going through the practice inspection which is called the Colonel's Review, in London. PETA's vice president Elisa Allen said, "Sometimes horses will lower their heads or move oddly when they're sore or injured".

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An unnamed source also told MailOnline, "William's horse looks drugged. Its head is on the floor. It's a disgrace." However, despite PETA's claims, nothing regarding the horse's condition is certain yet. Elisa Allen of PETA said, "Because horses, including those used for racing, are high-strung and easily frightened by noise and unexpected commotion, which can cause them to bolt, handlers have been known to administer sedatives to the animals ahead of public displays – a sure sign that they shouldn't be exposed to large parades in the first place."

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She added, "We can't know if this is the case here, as sometimes horses will lower their heads or move oddly when they're sore or injured. But horses shouldn't be put at risk. Just as the days of using horses for war are over, so, too, should be the days of placing these large, often skittish animals in situations that may spook them, thereby putting themselves, the rider, and the public at risk for injury."

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Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Colonel of the Irish Guards leads The Colonel's Review at Horse Guards Parade on May 28, 2022 in London, England. The Colonel's Review is the final evaluation of the Trooping the Colour parade before the event which will take place on Thursday, June 02, in celebration of Queen Elizabeth II's Platinum Jubilee. This year, it will be the Irish Guards Trooping their Colour, with the Duke of Cambridge evaluating the parade in his role as the regiment's Colonel. (Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)

For the rehearsal, William wore the red and blue military uniform which was adorned with medals. This look was completed with the traditional bearskin hat. Horses of the Household Cavalry that are part of such parades undergo special training to become accustomed to noise and traffic. Moreover, they are trained to stand still for long periods with weight.

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Two people had to be rushed to a major trauma hospital and three others needed treatment from paramedics after a stand collapsed at the Trooping the Colour rehearsal on May 21, Saturday.

The Queen's birthday on June 2 sees her Household Division troops march and ride on Horse Guards Parade with Her Majesty usually attending and taking the salute. However, this year, the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Cambridge and the Princess Royal will ride on the parade as colonels of the Welsh Guards, the Irish Guards and the Blues and Royals.
 

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