'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: Dr Ebonie Vincent removes 207 warts in gross yet satisfying case

A severe case of warts sees a man walking around with hundreds of lesions under his feet as well as hands


                            'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: Dr Ebonie Vincent removes 207 warts in gross yet satisfying case
Dr Ebonie's patient, Mitch, in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 (TLC)
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If you thought shows about pimple removal were 'difficult' to watch, the recent episode of 'My Feet Are Killing Me' was not for you. It was a living nightmare for people with trypophobia when they viewed this episode dedicated to a severe case of warts.

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'My Feet Are Killing Me,' a TLC program, is a reality show about problematic feet. The show, which stars Dr. Ebonie Vincent, Dr. Sarah Haller, and Dr. Brad Schaeffer, follows the foot doctors as they treat a variety of podiatric disorders. Mostly featuring extreme cases, the show is not for the faint of heart. So much so, that the program comes with a viewer discretion warning.

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Mitch, Dr. Ebonie's patient in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 (TLC)

In the most recent episode, Dr Ebonie Vincent, who is an excellent podiatrist and surgeon, was tasked with restoring her patient Mitch's confidence and getting him back on his feet. Dr Vincent is based in Orange County, California, and specializes in minimally invasive surgical procedures, and corrective and reconstructive foot and ankle surgery. Her other areas of specialization include diabetic limb salvage, juvenile foot problems, and sports medicine. Mitch, who has hundreds of lesions on his feet and palms, visits her. He explains that any walking activity means dealing with a burning sensation. With the pointy points jutting out, he reveals that he has forgotten when he last saw his feet as semi-normal.

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He has been in discomfort for a long time due to multiple growths that grow in and out of his hands and feet. As his wife, Angela, pointed out, this has had an impact not just on his career but also on his mental health. After searching for answers for so long, he is now concerned that this hereditary disease would impact his daughter as well. Mitch has admitted to seeing 12 doctors from the age of 28 before going to Dr Ebonie Vincent. When the doctor investigates a little more, she discovers that his feet are covered in what appear to be small stones lodged into his flesh, which cause pain when touched. Mitch stated that he had attempted to freeze or burn them off, but neither 'solution' worked. Dr Vincent noted that even Cantharone Treatment for Warts may not be able to help because they seem to reappear so quickly. Since the condition on his foot did not immediately scream warts or soft tissue tumors, Dr Vincent chooses to send it to the lab for a definitive conclusion. She initially numbs his big toe before going deep with a circular type of blade to discover what was going on. She was intrigued since the top half of the lesions felt softer than the bottom core, which felt firmer, like a callus coming out of his foot. She offers surgery to remove it all at once.

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Furthermore, she intended to punch all of these out and remove all the hard cores lying beneath, followed by the injection of stem cells that can encourage healthy tissue recovery. On the day of the surgery, the task of removing the lesions, stitching them, and then infusing stem cells into each of those regions was overwhelming. Mitch had hundreds of lesions on both of his feet that were on the point of becoming worse, so the surgeon made sure she could reach all the way deep enough to the center of it to remove it all, or else it would come back. Every lesion she removed was sent to the lab. She encircled the lesion with a sharp circular tool, allowing her to twist down to the core and excise them out directly from the center, so they didn't return. Even though it looked like corn kernels (just before popping) or honeycomb, it felt like small pebbles. Dr. Ebonie removed 105 lesions from Mitch's left foot and 102 from his right foot — a total of 207 warts. Dr. Ebonie sent him home after stitching up the wounds and infusing stem cells into the region, only to check on him in a few weeks to see if there were any improvements.

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Following surgery, Mitch was overall active and pain-free. The pathology results revealed that he had warts, and his genetic condition was discovered to be an Autosomal Dominant Trait, which implies that his body cannot regulate the growth factor. In other words, his body does not switch off the signal that causes warts, thus fresh warts may appear, which is what he still needs to be cautious and make sure it doesn't get out of hand.

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Before and After Mitch's surgery in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' (TLC)

'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 airs every Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET on TLC
 

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