'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: 'Fungal sisters' baffle viewers with their same foot condition

Dr Sarah Haller initially attempts to grasp the diagnosis, determining whether the sisters have the same hereditary ailment or if it is a condition caused by shared bacteria


                            'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: 'Fungal sisters' baffle viewers with their same foot condition
Dr Sarah Haller with her patients - Theresa, Denise, and Susan - in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 (TLC)
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In a first of its kind, Dr Sarah Haller attended to three patients at the same time. In a recent episode of 'My Feet Are Killing Me,' three sisters seek the help of Dr Haller to save their toenails.

Theresa, Denise, and Susan, three sisters, arrive at Dr Haller's office with fungal foot infections. Their toenails are depicted as thick, yellow, and unsightly. Theresa describes how her 10 toes have been in such bad shape over the past thirty years that they now resemble rotten mushrooms. She never wears flip-flops or open-toed shoes outside. Denise, the youngest sister, has black toenails that have thickened and become brittle (she compares them to rotting bananas). Susan has a disorder that causes her toenails to fall off as they grow, particularly her big toenails, which resemble dried-up pistachio nuts. Dr Haller initially attempts to grasp the diagnosis, determining whether they have the same hereditary ailment or if it is a condition caused by shared bacteria.

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Dr Haller decided on a biopsy because all of their toenails looked different from one another. Brittleness, yellow discoloration, and horn symptoms were all present in all three sisters, indicating fungus. Dr Haller was unable to rule out genetic or shared germs as potential causes of such conditions as the condition began to emerge around the age of thirty. The doctor speculated that it could be the result of hormonal changes as well. She collected samples from their toes and sent them for biopsy.

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Viewers of the show, on the other hand, were quick to come up with a diagnosis for the "fungal sisters." One of the viewers turned to Twitter to outline how such a condition might have occurred if they had not washed their feet at all. The user wrote: "I willing to bet the three nasty sisters haven’t been washing their feet because we know how that goes #MyFeetAreKillingMe" 

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Fans, on the other hand, couldn't help but laugh when Dr Haller referred to the siblings as "fungal sisters." One of the tweets read: "No, she did not just call them the "fungus sisters". That's so cute! #MyFeetAreKillingMe"

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One fan felt the sisters could do better and regain their confidence if they followed Dr Haller's treatment plan and painted their nails as they wanted. "@TLC
Haha. The finger points!! They have such pretty feet, they need nice nails!!! @Doctor_Haller #MyFeetAreKillingMe," said one user.

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One inquisitive viewer questioned how they all share the same ailment. Dr Haller revealed that they all had fungal infections after the biopsy results came back, with Susan's condition being the worse. The Twitter user wrote: "How does all three have fungus #MyFeetAreKillingMe"

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Dr Haller revealed to the sisters through video chat that they all had Onychomycosis, which can be treated with oral medication, a wash, and tropical items. Even though no bacteria were discovered, the fungal condition demanded immediate attention from all parties so that new nails could begin to grow in 8-12 months.

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Dr. Sarah Haller's patients in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 (TLC)

'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 airs every Wednesday at 9 pm ET on TLC.

Disclaimer: This article contains remarks made on the Internet by individual people and organizations. MEAWW cannot confirm them independently and does not support claims or opinions being made online.

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