'She's not going to be there?': Kate Middleton says her son Louis is 'asking too many questions' about Queen's death

Prince Louis, 4, and Prince George, 9, express their thoughts and emotions with mother Kate Middleton after the Queen’s death

'She's not going to be there?': Kate Middleton says her son Louis is 'asking too many questions' about Queen's death
Prince Louis', 4, eulogy for the late Queen Elizabeth II was presented to the public during the 40-minute walkabout at Windsor Castle (Aaron Chown/Paul Hackett - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
ADVERTISEMENT

UNITED KINGDOM: It was revealed that Prince William and Kate Middleton’s children have been very vocal about their great grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II’s death, asking numerous questions to their mother regarding what the future may look like to be for them.

At Buckingham Palace on Saturday, September 17, Kate chatted with Governor-General of Australia, David Hurley, about how her three children, Prince George, 9, Princess Charlotte, 7, and Prince Louis, 4, were coping with the tragic death of their great-grandmother. After meeting with Hurley along with other dignitaries before the Queen's burial, the Princess of Wales broke her silence with a sorrowful confession. During their chat, Mr. Hurley noted that Prince George, Kate's oldest kid, was "sort of now realising how important his great-grandmother was and what is going on." Louis, 4, has been enquiring, though, as to whether the family's summer trip to Balmoral Castle will still be as he recalls it. “The younger one is now asking questions like, 'do you think we can still play these games when we go to Balmoral and things like that, cause she's not going to be there?'" Mr Hurley said to Daily Mail.

READ MORE

ADVERTISEMENT

How many great-grandchildren did Queen Elizabeth II have? A look at the young royals

Queen and Prince Philip elated as George, Charlotte and Louis send them homemade card on 73rd wedding anniversary

ADVERTISEMENT

Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis (C), accompanied by their parents the Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, arrive for a settling in afternoon at Lambrook School, near Ascot on September 7, 2022 in Bracknell, England. The family have set up home in Adelaide Cottage in Windsor's Home Park as their base after the Queen gave them permission to lease the four-bedroom Grade II listed home.
Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis (C), accompanied by their parents Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, arrive for a settling-in afternoon at Lambrook School, near Ascot on September 7, 2022, in Bracknell, England (Jonathan Brady - Pool/Getty Images)

On September 8 at the age of 96, Queen Elizabeth II passed away in Balmoral, her cherished residence in Scotland. Prince George and Princess Charlotte are set to attend her burial, which is slated on September 19. Whereas, Prince Loius had a lot to say about his great-grandmother’s passing. His touching eulogy for the late Queen Elizabeth II was presented to the public during the 40-minute walkabout at Windsor Castle with members of the royal family soon after the Queen's passing. Banita Ranow, 28, a person present at the long walk among the crowd claimed she overheard Kate telling kids next to her about what her eldest son Louis had said about the Queen's passing. "Louis said at least grannie is with great grandpa now," she heard Kate saying.

The best way to deliver the news to your kids about the passing of the Queen, according to Margaret Rice, an Australian expert, is for the parents to "be honest" and "show their own emotion." The curator of the Good Grief website, Margaret Rice, told Daily Mail that it was "normal" for kids to "have a lot of questions".

ADVERTISEMENT

She also said that children experience grief and loss from a very young age, “They will want to talk about it quite a bit, and they might repeat questions, you might think you've answered the questions about it, but it comes back again in another way, and that's normal. If they're very little, they don't completely understand the finite nature of death, they don't process it the way adults do,” Rice added.

A young child will frequently "ask a lot of questions" if their own great-grandmother or grandparent passes away, according to Margaret, but every kid will behave differently, she explained. “Another child the same age in the same family might react completely differently. They're all different, if your child keeps wanting to talk about it, meet them where they are, be patient as they ask the questions.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Share this article: 'She's not going to be there?': Kate Middleton says her son Louis is 'asking too many questions' about Queen's death