John Leguizamo takes class on 'Latin History for Morons' trailer, ahead of November 5 release on Netflix

Netflix has just released the trailer for 'John Leguizamo: Latin History for Morons' and it is set to be the most hilarious history lesson you will ever attend.


                            John Leguizamo takes class on 'Latin History for Morons' trailer, ahead of November 5 release on Netflix

Class is in session! Netflix has just released the trailer for 'John Leguizamo: Latin History for Morons' and it is set to be the most hilarious history lesson you will ever attend. Examining nearly 3,000 years of Latino history with a rapid-fire lesson in overlooked Latin history, Colombian-American actor John Leguizamo charts everything from a satirical recap of Aztec and Inca history to stories of Latin patriots in the American Civil War, revealing how whitewashed history truly is in the one hour 30-minute long stand-up show.



 

The program, set to premiere on Netflix on November 5, is aptly summed up by the streaming giant as a one-man Broadway show by Leguizamo, who finds humor and heartbreak as he traces 3,000 years of Latin history in an effort to help his bullied son.



 

The acclaimed irreverent and witty show scored a Tony nomination for Best Play on Broadway and helped earn Leguizamo a special 2018 Tony for his theater work. The exclusive trailer kicks off with the 'Super Mario Bros.' star standing in a classroom set-up, looking like a nutty professor, a label he has modified to call himself 'Ghetto Scholar', that sees him lend some insight into his own history lesson - one that he got from his uncle. "Lucky for me," he begins, "My uncle did teach me about our Latin timeline."

He then heads to the board behind him, where he can be seen in his full avatar as 'Professor', decked in a classic classroom suit. He proceeds to break it down on the blackboard drawing a timeline from the "Mayans at 1,000 BC" to today's age - "Now". As the easy laughs pour in, he adds: "What is it? The age of Pitbull. Right?" He goes on to make a hilarious impersonation of the rapper and his songs, throwing himself into the act with his signature incisive wit and brazen humor.

Actor John Leguizamo takes a curtain call at the end of 'Latin History For Morons' Broadway Opening Night at Studio 54 on November 15, 2017, in New York City. (Getty Images)
Actor John Leguizamo takes a curtain call at the end of 'Latin History For Morons' Broadway Opening Night at Studio 54 on November 15, 2017, in New York City. (Getty Images)

He then asks the question that lays the foundation for the show: "But, yo, what happened in the 3,000 years between our great indigenous civilizations and us? How did we become so goddamn nonexistent?" Giving it a moment for it to sink in, he says, "Because if you don't see yourself represented outside of yourself, you just feel f******g invisible," thereby cementing the heart of the act.

"So, yo, I had good reason to panic, because as the great 20th Century Spanish philosopher, Santana, once said," he quips, quickly adding, "Oh, no, no, no. Not Carlos. George, who said 'Those who cannot remember their past are doomed to repeat it'," in his most trippy Spanish accent.

That brings him to what he calls the reason for the history lesson: "So, yo, ever since my son got bullied, I put a fat one on that bully. And I went on an intellectual jihad," he says as he stomps around the stage making his best "tough dad" impression. "So now, I'm a self-professed Ghetto Scholar. Hollah."

In a report on EW, it is said that when announcing Leguizamo’s Special Tony Award, the committee explained he was being "honored for his body of work and for his commitment to the theater, bringing diverse stories and audiences to Broadway for three decades." 

John Leguizamo at the 72nd Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 10, 2018, in New York City (Getty Images)
John Leguizamo at the 72nd Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 10, 2018, in New York City (Getty Images)

In his acceptance speech, Leguizamo paid tribute to migrants, saying, "I’m an immigrant, but I’m not an animal." The 'Empire' star talked about his childhood and running from it in Queens to Broadway. "This means a lot to me. Because it validates my work in theater," he continued. "In order for me to make it in theater, I had to create my own parts. Otherwise, I was just going to be relegated to playing the gangsters, the janitors, the drug dealers. But we Latin people are so much more than that. Theater has allowed me to be much more than that."

Though the show closed on Broadway in February, audiences will have a chance to revisit it (or see it for the first time) in the recording of the performance that premieres on Netflix this November 5.

Check out the trailer below: