Groove Armada 'Edge of the Horizon' Review: Veteran dance duo will get you grooving with first album in a decade

Groove Armada's new album consists of 10 classic sounding electronic music tracks that remind us of the heyday of the clubbing subculture


                            Groove Armada 'Edge of the Horizon' Review: Veteran dance duo will get you grooving with first album in a decade
Groove Armada (Getty Images)
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Groove Armada, the veteran British electronic music duo, has achieved something special with their first studio album in over a decade. 'Edge of the Horizon', which clocks in at over 47 minutes in length, consists of 10 classic sounding electronic music tracks that remind us of the heyday of the clubbing subculture.

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Groove Armada are one of the most loved and biggest selling dance acts in the world. They have played big stages as well as sweat-soaked basements for almost 25 years. Comprising of Andy Cato and Tom Findlay, the two musicians met in London in the mid-'90s and formed Groove Armada. They soon made an album in a week titled ‘Northern Star' followed by the major label release ‘Vertigo' which went on to sell over a million copies.

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The opening track, 'Get Out On the Dancefloor' featuring Nick Littlemore, is both spacey and heady at the same time. With flourishing cymbals in the background, its rock-inspired sound is enhanced by the strong performance. The first track, which swings between electronic passages and frantic singing, gives way to the next song titled 'Holding Strong' featuring James Alexander Bright. Creating a dreamy landscape, the veteran duo recreates strong and memorable '80s vibes that reminds you a cross between Depeche Mode and Duran Duran. The slow-burning track, which by the end turns into a standard electronic track, ends with rising drum beats before slowly fading away.

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Andy Cato and Tom Findlay of Groove Armada (Getty Images)

The following track, titled 'Tripwire' featuring Nick Littlemore, carries with it a similar '80s vibe that is still modern, despite its nostalgia factor. One of the best tracks on the record, 'Tripwire' has a retro feel which adds more and more layers as it progresses. 'Don't Give Up', the fourth track, deserves to be on everyone's Chill Mix playlist with its slow, soft, sweet and superfluous beat. Similarly, 'We're Free' featuring Roseau, is a slowly-rising song with a clear trap influence. It ventures into multiple different avenues of electronic music with its laid-back beat. The track is of the kind that's perfect for a small venue electronic music gig, especially because of its irresistible bass-line that is both sensual and groovy.

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The following song, the title track 'Edge of the Horizon', is more influenced by trance than the rest of the record. The longest track on the album, it quickly transcends into a quintessential EDM banger with an indelibly unforgettable beat with an epic outro. The next tack, 'Lover 4 Now' featuring Todd Edwards, is both joyful and playful. Edwards' vocal performance makes the track stand out along with its polished disco sound and nostalgic vibes.

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The next song, 'I Can Only Miss You' featuring Paris Brightledge, is slow-churning techno at its impressive best. Extremely catchy with trippy vibes, the rising guitar sounds in the background accompany the vocals in a delightful manner. But the best track on the record is 'What Cha Gonna Do With Your Love'. It takes time to build up, but once it does, it's absolutely a classic Groove Armada track. With sultry beats that are masterfully crafted, 'What Cha Gonna Do With Your Love' displays the veteran skills of Groove Armada.

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The next two tracks, 'Talk Talk' featuring James Alexander Bright and 'Dance Our Hurt Away' featuring Paris Brightledge, sound straight out of the '90s. Bonafide underground club bangers, 'Talk Talk' stands out with its twinkling synthesizer, addictive beat and unavoidable baseline. 'Dance Our Hurt Away', on the other hand, will get your body moving in no time. With elements that dissolve and reemerge throughout the track, 'Dance Our Hurt Away' is a perfect close to a great electronic music album by the London veterans.

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