'Panic! At the Disco' frontman Brenden Urie launches human rights organization

After U2's Bono, Brenden Urie launches his own organization to fight for people who do not have a voice of their own


                            'Panic! At the Disco' frontman Brenden Urie launches human rights organization

Panic! At the Disco's frontman Brendon Urie is starting a human rights organization called Highest Hopes Foundation. The band's official website has opened up a new column for the foundation where Urie posted an introduction for the organization: "Every single day, all of you show me strength, courage, and motivation, and as a result it felt important to create something to show you that I see all of the wonderful things you're doing out there in the world. With that being said, I want to join in the fight for those who cannot fight for themselves. Today I present to you the Highest Hopes Foundation, created to support the efforts of non-profit organizations that lead, develop, and advocate support for human rights. This is dedicated to all people + communities who are subject to discrimination or abuse on the basis of gender, race, religion, sexual orientation + gender identity."

The band also asked fans for support and motivation to fight for those who cannot fight for themselves. "All of you show me strength, courage + motivation & as a result, it felt important to create something to show you that I see the wonderful things you're doing out there in the world. With that being said, I want to join in on the fight for those who cannot fight for themselves," the band tweeted.



According to Billboard, the band will allocate $1 of each ticket from the US performances of its 'Pray For the Wicked Tour' to the organization. The report states that the tour will start on July 11 in Minneapolis, followed by places like New York’s Madison Square Garden and Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Pop Buzz reports that the frontman of the band has been an outright supporter of human rights causes since some time. In 2014, the singer reportedly donated $1,000 to Human Rights Campaign and a percentage of a Kansas City show's stock proceeds to the organization after the show was struck by the Westboro Baptist Church.

In 2017, he co-signed HRC's Equality Rocks campaign which is a part of the body that represents more than 3 million members and supporters worldwide. According to a statement on its website: "As the largest national lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer civil rights organization, HRC envisions a world where LGBTQ people are ensured of their basic equal rights and can be open, honest and safe at home, at work, and in the community."

Bono's campaing ONE helps spread awareness against poverty and AIDS. (Getty Images)
Bono's campaing ONE helps spread awareness against poverty and AIDS. (Getty Images)

'Panic! At the Disco' released its debut in 2005, after which the band downsized with only Urie remaining, with a touring band accompanying him on the road. The band earned a Grammy nomination for its 2016 album 'Death of a Bachelor', and its new album 'Pray for the Wicked' was released last week. The 31-year-old musician isn't, however, the first to establish his own non-profit organization. The Irish rock band, U2's, lead singer Paul David Hewson (Bono) started his own campaign 'ONE' in 2004, with a mission to fight against extreme poverty and diseases in Africa. Bono is also known to be the co-founder of RED, which spreads awareness against AIDS.