'Outlaw King': Chris Pine calls out the 'double standard' over full-frontal nudity in upcoming Netflix movie

Pine has spoken up about how the response has succeeded in emphasizing the evident double standard that exists for male and female stars when it comes to full frontal nudity.


                            'Outlaw King': Chris Pine calls out the 'double standard' over full-frontal nudity in upcoming Netflix movie

Netflix's upcoming film 'Outlaw King' has already garnered a massive fan following and most of it comes courtesy Chris Pine's full-frontal nudity. But in the events following the trailer that unleashed the blessing upon his hardcore fans, Pine has spoken up about how the sensational response has succeeded in emphasizing the evident double standard that exists for male and female stars when it comes to full-frontal nudity.

Pine's nude scene is in line with in his portrayal of Robert the Bruce, the King of Scots, who had led a rebellion to reclaim his power to the throne. The film drops on Netflix, this Friday, November 9, and soon after the trailer for the gory, brutal war movie hit the internet, both his fans and the media took the golden opportunity to address the glory that happens to be Pine's penis. Addressing the issue, Pine told the Press Association: “Firstly in exploring this kind of man who is to be called king and treated like a king, I thought it was important to see the king and the animal, the man, and the animal, that his feet are in the mud. That he is both violent and primitive and bestial, but also something else. So I thought to see the human de-clothed, and his animal self is really important.”

He continued: “Florence (Pugh, his co-star) shows her entire body in this film, and no-one is talking about that. And people want to talk about my penis like we’re a bunch of teenagers playing spin the bottle. I’d love to have an interesting conversation about why is it funny or pithy or a conversation to be had about that, whereas Florence is not. Is she expected to do that because she is a woman and I’m not expected to do that because I’m a man? What is it really? I don’t know, totally.

Addressing how this minor detail has received more attention than the other more poignant, discussion-worthy aspects of the movie, he added: “But certainly there’s a lot of violence in this film and people get de-bowelled and stuff like that, and no-one wants to talk about that. And I think it’s certainly a marker of our puritanical culture where if people make love, or show what God gave us, it’s somehow NC-17 (a US film rating, where nobody under 17 will be admitted) and you can de-bowel, behead, you can do all sorts of crazy shit like that and people are like ‘yeah that seems right’. Let’s put a big mirror up to us and say ‘Why? What’s going on guys?’”

(L-R) David Mackenzie, Aaron Taylor-Johnson , Gillian Berrie, Chris Pine and Scott Stuber attend the after party for the 'Outlaw King' TIFF 2018 opening night red carpet on September 6, 2018 in Toronto, Canada.
(L-R) David Mackenzie, Aaron Taylor-Johnson , Gillian Berrie, Chris Pine and Scott Stuber attend the after party for the 'Outlaw King' TIFF 2018 opening night red carpet on September 6, 2018 in Toronto, Canada.

Scottish director David Mackenzie, who's helming the film, and with whom Pine previously worked on Hell And High Water, also added: “I think it’s the social media age. This is the fifth film I’ve had full frontal male nudity, no-one’s ever had such a fuss about it. And it’s far less than I’ve ever had before, and it’s totally motivated. The guy is washing himself in a loch in the Highlands, and just pops out - I don’t know what the fuss is about. And it says something about our times and I wish people would get over it.”

As per Pine, he admitted he knew nothing about the Scottish king before Mackenzie had discussed the idea with him while the two were promoting their previous project. Speaking about the same, he said: “It was David, first and foremost (that was the attraction), because I’d had such a wonderful experience working with him last time. It was the fact that it was swords and horses and mud and that appealed to my eight-year-old self. And it was the fact that it was a big budget hero journey kind of David and Goliath story but through the lens of David’s eye, which made it incredibly interesting to me."

With reference to what attracted him to the project, he shared: "I think what I liked about Robert the Bruce is that he was not William Wallace, he wasn’t served on a platter in terms of his heroism. He was a man complicated by his own weaknesses and simultaneously strong and vulnerable, and Machiavellian and selfless, and all these great things that I felt made him tremendously human.”