‘Grant’ on History channel: How black soldiers and former slaves were championed in Leonardo DiCaprio's show

The Leonardo DiCaprio stresses on Grant's focus on the Emancipation Proclamation and how he ordered the Union Army to include almost 40,000 former slaves


                            ‘Grant’ on History channel: How black soldiers and former slaves were championed in Leonardo DiCaprio's show
(History)
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In the pantheon of American heroes, 18th president Ulysses S Grant stands alongside presidents like George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. He led the troops to win the Civil War, re-unified the nation and helped bring freedom to four million former slaves.

As the pages of the second chapter of ‘Grant’ were unfurled on History channel, it led to the forgotten past when enslaved men were treated as Contraband of War. In November 1865, President Andrew Johnson, who succeeded Abraham Lincoln sent Grant on a fact-finding mission to the South. While Johnson advised against using black troops and encouraged them to take up farm labor, Grant opposed his views and said that both whites and blacks in the South required protection by the federal government.

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Peeping into those tales, the Leonardo DiCaprio miniseries stresses on Grant's focus on the Emancipation Proclamation and how he ordered the Union Army to include almost 40,000 former slaves and gave them clothes, shelter and wages for their services.

'Grant' (History)

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Touched after watching the section on black soldiers, fans can't stop thanking the makers. "#Grant documentary taking on slavery, emancipation proclamation, and black soldiers is so, so, so important. This is a great section of the documentary. #Grant2," one wrote and another said, "I tell our students that the most important part of the Emancipation Proclamation, especially to Grant, was that it allowed black men to serve as soldiers. Grant believed in the concept of the citizen-soldier and black men, he believed, earned their citizenship in war #GRANT."

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Historian Kevin M Levin posted, "That was a very good synopsis of the process of emancipation and the introduction of black men into the Union ranks. Well done @HISTORY #GRANT." Another said, "Raw Black soldiers had a lot of pent up aggression to fight with. Hell yeah they’d be a good fighting resource. #Grant."

One even asked for a whole series on them. "Yes! #Grant featuring the Black Regiments. I want a whole series on them too," one tweet read and another said, "Black men were not only serving as soldiers by 1863, but also serving with ambulance crews as well. #HistMed #Grant." Another said, "They're finally discussing emancipation and black soldiers! #GRANT!"

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'Grant' (History)

"As we see African American laborers, they were also being employed aboard the hospital ships in the Mississippi River. Several black refugees became nurses aboard the USS Red River. #HistMed #Grant #Grant2," one viewer posted and another said, "Most important victory outside of Jackson is Champion Hill. Impressive, alongside win at Big Black, for Grant. #Grant."

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Not just that, many even pointed out how black historians love retelling the story of Grant. "Couldn't help but notice number of black historians involved in telecast. It actually excited me in terms of the black historians who praised many of #Grant actions. In totality, key is to support #civilrights movement," one said and another wrote, "4 black historians have given commentary in the miniseries and I am absolutely ecstatic. We in here. #Grant."

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The miniseries premiered on Memorial Day and aired over three consecutive nights beginning Monday, May 25, at 9 pm ET on History channel.