Ex-employee Graham Chase Robinson claims Robert De Niro FORCED her to ‘clean house’ for Martin Scorsese’s visit

A bombshell transcript of Robinson's deposition reveals that she found De Niro's behavior 'demeaning'


                            Ex-employee Graham Chase Robinson claims Robert De Niro FORCED her to ‘clean house’ for Martin Scorsese’s visit
Robinson began as De Niro's assistant but worked her way up to Vice President of Production and Finance at his company Canal Productions (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for CinemaCon, Youtube/ABC News and Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)
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Graham Chase Robinson, a former female executive at Robert De Niro's production company, Canal Productions made a bombshell claim that De Niro's behavior towards her was "very demeaning" as she was forced to 'clean up' and 'set table' at De Niro's apartment before Martin Scorsese's visit.

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Robinson's astonishing testimony transcript was made public by RadarOnline.com. Before we get into the testimony, here is a piece of brief background information: In 2008, at the age of 25, Robinson started working as De Niro's executive assistant. After she left her post as vice president of production and finance at Canal Productions Inc. in 2019, De Niro and Canal Productions sued Robinson for $6 million in the month of August that followed her resignation. She was accused of misusing business credit cards ($12,696.65 in unauthorized charges at Paola's restaurant) and having binge-watched several episodes of television while working, including 55 episodes of 'Friends,' and 20 episodes of 'Arrested Development,' and 10 episodes of 'Schitt's Creek.'

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In response, Robinson accused De Niro of gender discrimination and filed a $12 million lawsuit against him in federal court in New York in October 2019. She claimed that she was treated like an "office wife." She accused De Niro of routinely making "vulgar, inappropriate, and gendered statements" in her initial claim, which was also filed in 2019, as well as overworking and underpaying her. She said he "paid his male personal trainer more than her."

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Gregory Bennett, De Niro's attorney, declared in April of this year that he was ready to "amend the answer to Robinson's suit and assert counterclaims." The defense attorney for Robinson, Alexandra Harwin, retorted that this action was taken in bad faith and advised that De Niro visit Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance's office "in this feud."

Robert De Niro attends
De Niro and Robinson filed dueling lawsuits in which they accuse each other of acting improperly. The Hollywood star’s lawsuit demands $6 million in damages from his one-time personal assistant (Roy Rochlin/Getty Images for Tribeca Festival)

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Robinson was interrogated about her allegation that De Niro had her wash his linens, put away his boxers, hang up his clothes, vacuum his apartment, and set the table for him during the deposition. She cited Martin Scorsese's birthday celebration as one instance. She said, "That was one of the many times that I've had to set a table."

De Niro's attorney then asked, "But are you suggesting that you were some sort of domestic servant who would come in and set a table for him, like a housekeeper?" Robinson said, "That's what the Martin Scorsese one is. I vacuumed the apartment. I cleaned the apartment. I set up the table, put the napkins, and the plates, and lit the candles. Tiffany [De Niro's girlfriend] and Bob had me straighten up the house."

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"It was just very demeaning and I like — I can't believe that I was asked to do that," Robinson said. "I was the VP of production and finance at the time and here I was setting a table and vacuuming his house." De Niro recently achieved a little victory in the lawsuit when the judge let him examine Robinson's mental state.

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