What is Tua Tagovailoa's net worth? Miami Dolphins QB lives solely off his endorsement deals

Tua Tagovailoa signed a $30.3 million rookie contract last year with the Dolphins, bagging a $19.6 million signing bonus


                            What is Tua Tagovailoa's net worth? Miami Dolphins QB lives solely off his endorsement deals
Tua Tagovailoa #1 throws a touchdown pass to Durham Smythe #81 of the Miami Dolphins against the Los Angeles Chargers at Hard Rock Stadium on November 15, 2020, in Miami Gardens (Mark Brown/Getty Images)

Tua Tagovailoa has sparked the interest of NFL fans across the country after delivering promising performances at training camp practices in the lead-up to the pre-season. Many are said to be curious about his net worth and financial portfolio.

The Miami Dolphins quarterback drew mixed reviews during his rookie season last year, albeit he helped the team to a 6-3 record as the starter and almost singlehandedly led the group into the playoffs. The Alabama native impressed league stakeholders with solid raw stats, including passing for 1,814 yards and 11 touchdowns against five interceptions in 10 games. Meanwhile, his 6.3 yards per attempt was well below average for a starter, 247 Sports reported.

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What is Tua Tagovailoa's net worth?

Born in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, in a Samoan family, Tua is the oldest of four children and grew up with an intense passion for football. His parents Galu and Diane Tagovailoa noted how he would sleep with a football under his arm every night as a child. According to Sportjone, Tua Tagovailoa's current net worth is estimated at $1 million.

In this still image from video provided by the NFL, Tua Tagovailoa shows off the lining of his jacket during the first round of the 2020 NFL Draft on April 23, 2020. (Photo by NFL via Getty Images)

Tagovailoa distinguishes himself from many professional athletes who make millions of dollars only to end up broke at the end of their careers. The former Alabama quarterback signed a $30.3 million rookie contract last year with the Dolphins, bagging a $19.6 million signing bonus. Considering his bright future prospects, he will be guaranteed more millions in the years to come. However, it is impressive to note how he's not spending any of his contract money and is living solely off his endorsement deals.

Tagovailoa explained his mindset during an interview with GQ last year. “I’m gonna be living off of my marketing money, so the endorsement money that I get, and then everything else is just put to the side,” he said. “So the money that I’m making from my contract, that’s put to the side, so none of that’s gonna be seen.”

That's not to say Tagovailoa has lived a frugal life since becoming a pro. He spent $200,000 on three automobiles, one of which he gave to his mom as a Mother’s Day present. He splurged $1.65 million for a lakefront home in Davie, Florida, which he decked out with $30,000 worth of workout equipment. Tagovailoa also purchased a $10,000 Rolex watch for his father after signing his Dolphins contract.

Tua Tagovailoa #1 of the Miami Dolphins looks on before the start of the game against the Jacksonville Jaguars at TIAA Bank Field on September 24, 2020, in Jacksonville, Florida. (Photo by James Gilbert/Getty Images)

“I would say I’m happy with what I spent it on,” Tagovailoa told GQ. “It wasn’t more so me when I thought of the purchases. I thought of everyone that would be involved in the purchase as well, except maybe one of them.” That said, Tagovailoa also has marketing deals with several big brands including Adidas, Bose, Fanatics, Gillette, Muscle Milk, Verizon, and Wingstop

Having said that, the Dolphins QB is reportedly taking a big step forward in his second year with the franchise, just as the team had hoped for. Coach Brian Flores said Tagovailoa is off to a good start at the training camp practices. Meanwhile, several Dolphins players told Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald that he was playing at a different level since his rookie year.

Tua Tagovailoa #1 of the Miami Dolphins looks to pass against the Los Angeles Rams during their NFL game at Hard Rock Stadium on November 01, 2020, in Miami Gardens, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)

“He’s always had accuracy. That was never a problem. He always had the zip, always had the power,” safety Eric Rowe said. “I just believe it’s that year-two jump that everyone needs to make from their rookie year. And obviously the type of offense. Last year, I even noticed his playbook was condensed to slants and bubbles. They really wouldn’t let him show his arm. Now seeing training camp, a lot more deep routes, they’re allowing him the opportunity to throw it deep. That’s what we need. Tua is making that jump. I see each day he’s getting better from the first day.”

Tight end Durham Smythe also acknowledged the difference in Tagovailoa's game. “It just seems like confidence. That’s a big thing for year-one to year-two players,” he said. “He understands the offense, yada, yada, has got a great arm. Everyone says that. Everyone knows that. But confidence year one to year two, that’s big. If he continues to develop that, the sky’s the limit.”

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