'The Passage' episode 7 review: Elizabeth's unexpected death will likely further strain Fanning and Jonas' friendship

Things just got a whole lot more personal and while Jonas will choose to blame Fanning for his wife's death, the latter will potentially be all the more driven to avenge her death


                            'The Passage' episode 7 review: Elizabeth's unexpected death will likely further strain Fanning and Jonas' friendship

This may contain spoilers for 'The Passage' season 1 episode 7: 'You Are Like The Sun'

This week's episode of Fox's 'The Passage' was both emotional, daunting, and an all round twister of sorts. A sudden, unexpected death proved to be the game changer for almost every single character, and at the same time, it's as if this death was exactly what the show needed, midway through its debut season to hit viewers with an undeniable impact, and the bitter realization of how far these ambitious fools and monstrous creatures are willing to go, to hold power and control over the planet.

The death in question is Elizabeth Lear's - the same woman who was at the inception of Project NOAH, the one for whom both Jonas Lear (Henry Ian Cusick) and Tim Fanning (Jamie McShane) were willing to risk their all in this risky medical trial. In the initial stages of the show based on Justin Cronin's hit trilogy of the same name, we were introduced to Elizabeth as Lear's wife who was suffering from Alzheimer's.

It was to obtain a cure for all diseases riddling humanity, and especially his wife, that Lear indulged in the project with his best friend, Fanning. But later, as it turned out, Fanning and Elizabeth were past lovers too at one point, thereby explaining his interest in injecting her with the same bat-virus the other "virals" were injected with.

Of course, there was no stopping Fanning, and Elizabeth went through the same process Fanning himself did, turning into the vampiric creatures the test subjects of Project NOAH have turned into, but sadly, she did not choose to live as a monster with superhuman strength. But even though she chose to die, her death will definitely amplify the strain in Fanning and Jonas' friendship, now that their topic of conflict is not just the trial's ethics.

Things just got a whole lot more personal and while Jonas will choose to blame Fanning for his wife's death, the latter will potentially be all the more driven to avenge her death because she was the only semblance of love remaining in his life. But Jonas and Fanning aren't the only ones whose course of action will be heavily affected by Elizabeth's death.

True, Jonas will probably be even more active in seeking to curb their humanized weapons agenda, now that it took the life of someone so close to him. And Fanning, on the other hand, will work extra harder to make the same plan successful because of his unfulfilled dreams revolving around a life with Elizabeth.

With two such pivotal characters so driven by emotions, it's quite possible Shauna Babcock (Brianne Howie) - one of the OG virals - might make a leap for power. With Jonas not noticing, and Fanning too blinded in his search for vengeance, it's quite likely she might rise to dethrone both, and that will be interesting to witness indeed!

Fanning's (L) character will presumably go through a lot of emotional turmoil following Elizabeth's (R) death. Source: Fox
Fanning's (L) character will presumably go through a lot of emotional turmoil following Elizabeth's (R) death. Source: Fox

And, of course, Amy Bellafonte's (Saniyya Sidney) life is going to go through a whirlwind in light of recent developments, because she is the protagonist after all. Now with Elizabeth's death spurring Fanning to expand his plans of taking over, he will definitely try to take Amy under his wing, considering she is the only viral who came out of the infiltration unscathed and with telepathic powers.

Also, she could be the only one capable of taking down Fanning, so it's quite likely Fanning will try to manipulate her, but this is where the layered nature of Amy's character comes into play. While we see her vulnerable and crumbling upon meeting her mother for one final time, we also see how calm and poised she is when the new evil mastermind, Horace Guilder (James Le Gros), tries to play her into believing he could offer her security.

She is allowed to say a proper goodbye to her mother in the 'mindscape' (a simulation) and we see her bursting into emotion, admitting she did not mean the hateful words she had uttered to her right before she died. In that moment, it is almost impossible to register her as the same calm and collected mature person we have seen on the show so far. But the very next moment Amy pretty much owns the interaction with Guilder like it's no big deal and we are left marveling at the glorious talent that is Sidney.



 

There were a couple of loose ends in episode 7, which, much to the dismay of viewers, kind of pulled back the pace and intrigue of this particular episode. This is especially the case when it comes to other side-characters going about a certain course of action - the plot pans out without offering a backstory behind why they are doing the things they are - something that hasn't been an issue with the show's main characters.

But with this pivotal twist that comes with Elizabeth's death, the lack of explanation behind their actions, is balanced out because they are far more important things to focus on, as the plot gets murkier and Amy's journey gets even more dangerous.

'The Passage' returns with episode 8 Monday, March 4, at 9/8c, only on Fox.

Disclaimer : The views expressed in this article belong to the writer and are not necessarily shared by MEAWW.