MEGHAN MARKLE'S BOMBSHELLS: From Archie and Lilibet being called the 'n-word' to Nelson Mandela

Several revelations were made by Markle in a recent interview, from life in Montecito to her and Harry's jibes at the royal family

MEGHAN MARKLE'S BOMBSHELLS: From Archie and Lilibet being called the 'n-word' to Nelson Mandela
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle attend a reception for young people at the Palace of Holyroodhouse on February 13, 2018 in Edinburgh, Scotland (Photo by Andrew Milligan - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
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MONTECITO, CALIFORNIA: Meghan Markle is not one to shy away from revelations, especially those related to her life as a former British royal family member. In a recent interview with journalist Allison P Davies for New York magazine The Cut, she has uncovered several facets of her past experiences, as well as her current lavish life in Montecito. In an elaborate profile, Davies writes about everything - from husband Harry gushing over a conjoined palm tree at their home, to the ambiguous "moaning" and "guttural sounds" emitted by the duchess in an answer to a question.

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Markle's comments on her falling out with her own father, toxic tabloid culture and the comparison of her wedding to Nelson Mandela's release have all made news. Her surprising allegation of her children being referred to by the "N-word" has also caused quite a stir. The 'Princess of Montecito' has spilled quite a few beans. 

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Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex attend the 2021 Salute To Freedom Gala at Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum on November 10, 2021 in New York City.
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex attend the 2021 Salute To Freedom Gala at Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum on November 10, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)

On strained family relations

On her strained relationship with her father, Thomas Markle, the interviewer explains that Meghan believed it was the "toxic tabloid culture" that tore the two families apart. This can also be viewed in terms of Prince Harry's own relationship with his father, Prince Charles. At one point, Meghan said, "Harry said to me, 'I lost my dad in this process'. It doesn’t have to be the same for them as it was for me, but that’s his decision."

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This statement has been understood by many to mean that Harry lost his father owing to the fallout. But according to the Daily Mail, supporters of the couple, like royal reporter Omid Scobie said, "I understand that Prince Harry is actually referring to Meghan’s loss of her own father, and Meghan is saying she doesn’t want Harry to lose his." Notably, the couple's infamous interview with Oprah Winfrey added fuel to their rift with the royal family. 

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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, Duke and Duchess of Sussex leave after a service of thanksgiving for the reign of Queen Elizabeth II at St Paul's Cathedral in London, Friday, June 3, 2022 on the second of four days of celebrations to mark the Platinum Jubilee. The events over a long holiday weekend in the U.K. are meant to celebrate the monarch's 70 years of service.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, Duke and Duchess of Sussex leave after a service of thanksgiving for the reign of Queen Elizabeth II at St Paul's Cathedral in London, Friday, June 3, 2022 on the second of four days of celebrations to mark the Platinum Jubilee. The events over a long holiday weekend in the U.K. are meant to celebrate the monarch's 70 years of service. (Photo by Matt Dunham - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

On their decision to leave the UK

Many may recall the public criticism faced by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex back in 2020 when they decided to go forward with the refurbishment of Frogmore Cottage, their previous residence in Windsor. The general masses were not pleased to learn that the renovations of nearly $28,16,719 were to be funded by the taxpayers. Referring to this, Markle said that both she and Harry wished to earn their own money back then so that they could not be further attacked under the "guise of public interest," hoping that then "maybe all the noise would stop." 

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In fact, the couple was ready to move to any commonwealth country including Canada, New Zealand, or South Africa. They had also suggested a hybrid model of arrangements, where their official public duties and private commercial work could coexist. This, however, was not permitted "for whatever reason... even though several other members of the family do that exact thing."

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Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex visit One World Observatory at One World Observatory on September 23, 2021 in New York City.
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex visit One World Observatory at One World Observatory on September 23, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)

Their Montecito mansion 

"The Montecito house is the kind of big that startles you into remembering that unimaginable wealth is actually someone’s daily reality," writes Davies. But according to the duchess, they had found it to be too expensive, considering that the couple "didn't have jobs." It was the multi-million dollar deals that they signed with Netflix and Spotify that prompted them to give the house a try. A tour of the property was the final nudge they needed and they fell in love "almost immediately."

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In fact, the property bears an emblem that represents the two - a pair of conjoined palm trees. Markle recalls, "One of the first things my husband saw when we walked around the house was those two palm trees," adding that he said, "See how they’re connected at the bottom? My love, it’s us."

On the surprising comparison of her wedding to Mandela's release

Markle also revealed an incident during the 2019 premiere of the live-action version of 'The Lion King' in London. Recalling her interaction with a South African cast member she said, "He looked at me, and he’s just like light. He said, 'I just need you to know: When you married into this family, we rejoiced in the streets the same we did when Mandela was freed from prison'." 

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Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor meet Archbishop Desmond Tutu at the Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019 in Cape Town, South Africa.
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor meet Archbishop Desmond Tutu at the Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Toby Melville - Pool/Getty Images)

On her children being called the N-word 

Allegations of racism faced by Markle are not new. What was perhaps the most unexpected revelation in the entire interview was her claims that her children faced the same and were called the extremely offensive racist slur. The context for this was Markle talking about her ire at the royal Family's arrangement of releasing pictures of her children via the royal correspondents, dubbed the Royal Rota, before she could post them herself. 

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According to the interviewer, the duchess was not comfortable with this owing to her "strained relationship with the British tabloids." Here, Markle was quoted as saying, "Why would I give the very people that are calling my children the N-word a photo of my child before I can share it with the people that love my child?"

On being seen as a "real-life princess"

Markle says that she's aware of her public perception as a princess and is aware of the responsibilities it entails. "It’s important to be thoughtful about it because - even with the Oprah interview, I was conscious of the fact that there are little girls that I meet and they’re just like, 'Oh my God, it’s a real-life princess.'" Wanting to be a good role model, she says, "I just look at all of them and think, 'You have the power within you to create a life greater than any fairy tale you’ve ever read'. I don’t mean that in terms of 'You could marry a prince one day.' I mean you can find love. You can find happiness."

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Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex meet with local children as they arrive at Dubbo Airport on October 17, 2018 in Dubbo, Australia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on their official 16-day Autumn tour visiting cities in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand.
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex meet with local children as they arrive at Dubbo Airport on October 17, 2018 in Dubbo, Australia. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are on their official 16-day Autumn tour visiting cities in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images)

On the dual role of being a model and a mother

Popping in for a moment, Prince Harry recalled how he had to comfort his wife and boost her confidence. Speaking to Markle, he says, "Tell [the interviewer] the first thing you said when you got back last night." He then revealed what it was, "She said, 'I’m not a model'. I was like, 'No, you are, of course you can be a model'. And she’s like, 'I’m a mom!' And it’s like, 'You can be both.'"

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Manners and salt-and-pepper shakers

The couple are currently working on teaching their son, Archie, 3, manners. On this note, Markle recalled something she had heard her friend's mother say, "Salt and pepper are always passed together." Then she added, "You never move one without the other. That’s me and Harry. We’re like salt and pepper. We always move together.’

(L-R) Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex arrive to attend Christmas Day Church service at Church of St Mary Magdalene on the Sandringham estate on December 25, 2018 in King's Lynn, England.
(L-R) Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex arrive to attend Christmas Day Church service at Church of St Mary Magdalene on the Sandringham estate on December 25, 2018 in King's Lynn, England. (Photo by Stephen Pond/Getty Images)

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Prince Harry's snarky comment

In the interview, the youngest son of Prince Charles revealed that he and his wife worked together for their company, Archewell, from their home office. The shared space, he said, felt "natural and normal." He also remarked, "Most people that I know and many of my family, they aren’t able to work and live together." According to the interviewer, the word "family" was pronounced with "a vocal eye roll." 

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Moaning and guttural sounds? 

According to the interviewer, Markle made certain sounds at one point of their conversation and even suggested how they must be understood. She writes, "At one point in our conversation, instead of answering a question, she will suggest how I might transcribe the noises she’s making: She’s making these guttural sounds, and I can’t quite articulate what it is she’s feeling in that moment because she has no word for it; she’s just moaning."

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Deal with Netflix

A documentary on the couple is currently in the works, with Markle revealing that it would focus on their love story. "The piece of my life I haven’t been able to share, that people haven’t been able to see, is our love story," she said. 

Queen Elizabeth II, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Prince William Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge watch the RAF 100th anniversary flypast from the balcony of Buckingham Palace on July 10, 2018 in London, England.
Queen Elizabeth II, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Prince William Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge watch the RAF 100th anniversary flypast from the balcony of Buckingham Palace on July 10, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by Paul Grover - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

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Silent no more?

Not one for keeping her silence, the Duchess of Sussex said, "I’ve never had to sign anything that restricts me from talking," adding, "I can talk about my whole experience and make a choice not to." Addressing a question on the latter statement, she responded that she was "Still healing." The interviewer also asks her if their is any room for forgiveness or a chance of reconciliation between her and the royal family. To this she replied, "It takes a lot more energy to not forgive. But it takes a lot of effort to forgive. I’ve really made an active effort, especially knowing that I can say anything."

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The final sentence is rather telling, Markle "can say anything" and her royal-in-laws must constantly be on their toes. 

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