'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: Can Dr Haller help sisters Denise, Theresa and Susan with fungal issue?

Dr Sarah Haller is approached by three sisters seeking relief from a family curse of funky feet.


                            'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: Can Dr Haller help sisters Denise, Theresa and Susan with fungal issue?
Denise, Theresa, Susan & Dr. Sarah Haller in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' (Instagram/tlc)
ADVERTISEMENT

When TLC's 'My Feet Are Killing Me' returns on May 19, Dr Sarah Haller will be attending three patients at the same time in the third episode of this season.

There are lots of folks who would admit that being around feet is not anyone's idea of a fun time. Dr Sarah Haller, on the other hand, has made a career out of other people's feet. The New Jersey-based podiatrist has been in practice for less than a decade and has become a reality TV celebrity. Dr Haller appears on TLC's new blockbuster show, 'My Feet Are Killing Me.' This program tells the stories of people who have had life-changing foot surgery. Three patients are followed in each hour-long episode as they prepare for and endure surgery. 

ADVERTISEMENT

RELATED ARTICLES

'My Feet Are Killing Me': Dana Carl's case of bunions sees a massive shock during surgery

'My Feet Are Killing Me': Neoeko's broken tibia from 2008 finally fixed by Dr Ebonie Vincent

ADVERTISEMENT



 

As a cast member on the TLC show 'My Feet Are Killing Me,' Dr Haller has been able to share her talents with the world in ways she could never have dreamed. In the most recent episode of the TLC show, Dr Haller is approached by three sisters, all of whom have foot fungus. The sisters describe their toenails as thick, yellow, unsightly, and just dreadful. Theresa, the eldest, explains that her toenails had been like that for 30 years, preventing her from wearing flip-flops or open toes outside.

ADVERTISEMENT

Denise, the youngest sibling, reports that her toenails have become black. Her toenails appear to become exceedingly thick and brittle. Susan, the middle sister, claims that her toenails develop only to fall off on her big toenails. Dr. Haller is very interested in discovering where it came from. The doctor's first obvious guess was genetics. They could have inherited or been walking on the same carpet in the house, according to her guess. Dr Sarah Haller will be seeing all three patients at the same time, which is extremely unusual. She'll have all six feet of the patients on one chair, with a lot to unpack.

ADVERTISEMENT

The middle sister describes her toenail as "dried up pistachio nuts." Other siblings speak up, with Therese comparing her toenails to decaying mushrooms and her youngest sister claiming that her toenails resemble an old banana when they become black. Everyone's ailment began while they were in their early 30s. They tried everything, including lotion, nail paint, solution, peroxide, and others, but nothing worked. They claimed that these substances made their feet worse. When questioned if anyone else in the family has it, they revealed that their mother is also a victim. She has such thick toenails that she has been requesting a hedge clipper.

ADVERTISEMENT

To find out if and how Dr Haller can assist these ladies, watch 'My Feet Are Killing Me' on TLC on Thursdays at 9 p.m. ET.