"We need a full FBI investigation" Actor Jason Ritter on allegations against Kavanaugh

Actor Jason Ritter says that he always feels suspicious when somebody doesn't want something to be investigated.


                            "We need a full FBI investigation" Actor Jason Ritter on allegations against Kavanaugh

Brett Kavanaugh hearing has become yet another bipartisan issue to have divided the nation. And, Despite the emotions, the allegations and the hurt feelings, the hearing of Thursday, September 27, was mostly he said, she said; except she said it way more eloquently, elegantly and clearly than he did. 

Many believe that for the truth to finally come out, an FBI investigation is absolutely necessary. However, this does not seem to be in the cards for the Republican party, who nominated Kavanaugh as the Supreme Court Judge. 

Like most Americans, actor Jason Ritter wonders why there is no push-back on this. "I am always a proponent of getting as much information as you possibly can, and I definitely think... I am definitely with the American Bar Association and everyone else that's saying we need to have a full FBI investigation before he can be confirmed," he tells Meaww

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Kavanaugh was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy on the court left by retiring Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy.

"It always makes me feel suspicious when somebody doesn't want something to be investigated. I don't understand why. I am hoping that they do that. I don't understand at a certain point why they didn't just try to put up somebody else," he says, adding, "I think Kavanaugh is problematic in several ways, even putting aside this whole thing."

Seeing, the sexual assault allegations against Kavanaugh, way in the past, it was expected to be yet another issue that splits the nation into two - one group that backs the victim and the other, the "falsely" accused. However, after Christine Blasey Ford, the woman accusing Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her in high school spoke at the hearing, even the Republicans had to agree that they were in trouble. 

Dr Ford's calm demeanor and willingness to explain in detail the very traumatic experience of her life proved that she is indeed very credible. "Watching the testimony yesterday I found Dr Ford extremely credible, and that is actually one of the bravest things I have ever seen," says Ritter. 

Christine Blasey Ford, testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Christine Blasey Ford, testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

He further adds: "I feel so terrible for her, that she has gotten all these death threats and had to move and stuff like that. I hope she feels the love from everybody vocally supporting her and it really was incredibly courageous what she did."

The congress is voting on the issue as of Friday, September 28, and the Republicans will need 50 votes to confirm the President Donald Trump’s appointment.