Psychologists explain how the birth order of Prince William and Kate Middleton's third baby will affect its personality

The eldest siblings are mostly natural leaders and high achievers, while middle children run the risk of feeling left out in the crowd.


                            Psychologists explain how the birth order of Prince William and Kate Middleton's third baby will affect its personality
Prince William and Kate Middleton (Source:Getty Images)

The celebrations are on, as Kate Middleton gave birth to a baby boy on Monday at 11.01 am in the Lindo wing of St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, London. Prince William and Kate, who are already parents to Prince George and Princess Charlotte, make it a little hard to guess how their third child will be brought up.

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, pose for photographers with their newborn baby boy outside the Lindo Wing of St Mary's Hospital on April 23, 2018 in London, England. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's third child was born this morning at 11:01, weighing 8lbs 7oz. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

 

However, according to psychologists across the globe, a lot can be determined simply through the birth order of a child. An expert opinion on the third child in any family is that they grow up to be sociable and outgoing, which makes them extremely charming, but they also turn out to be quite manipulative by nature.

“Be sure your last born does not get away with murder in regard to family rules and regulations,” says Dr. Kevin Leman in his book The Birth Order Book: Why You Are The Way You Are. “Statistics show the last born is least likely to be disciplined and the least likely to toe the mark the way the older children did.”

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge's newborn son at St Mary's Hospital on April 23, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

 

US psychologist Frank Sulloway says that the youngest kids are the most adventurous of the lot at all times. According to him, since the youngest kids usually look for an "unoccupied family niche", they mostly turn out to be "more exploratory and open to experience".

He told the Sun that the youngest children “are seeking out alternative ways of deriving the maximum benefit out of the environment, and not directly competing for the same resources as the eldest."

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge depart the Lindo Wing with their newborn son at St Mary's Hospital on April 23, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by John Stillwell - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

 

In comparison to the youngest child, the eldest, like Prince George, are mostly natural leaders and high achievers, with a tendency to act like mini-adults from a very young age. On the other hand, middle children like Princess Charlotte run the risk of feeling left out in the crowd.

“Middle children often go to an extreme to get attention, which is why some dye their hair purple or become a fanatic about a particular singing group — because they need an identity really bad,” said Meri Wallace, who is a child and family therapist and has also authored a book called Birth Order Blue.

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge arrives with Prince George and Princess Charlotte at the Lindo Wing after Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge gave birth to their son at St Mary's Hospital on April 23, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)