Did Tucker Carlson REALLY blame women for mass shootings in US? Here's what he actually said

The Fox News host also blamed social media, porn, video games, and 'government-endorsed weed' as contributing factors to the troubled behavior of young men


                            Did Tucker Carlson REALLY blame women for mass shootings in US? Here's what he actually said
Tucker Carlson on Tuesday addressed the mass shooting that took place in Highland Park during a Fourth of July parade (Fox News)
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Fox News host Tucker Carlson opened his Tuesday show discussing the mass shooting that took place at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois. The mass shooting was allegedly carried out by 21-year-old Robert “Bobby” Crimo. Carlson pointed out that authorities, mostly women, in the lives of such young men who use firearms on innocent bystanders, never stop lecturing them on their "so-called men's privilege" and this acts as a contributing factor to the mass shootings. In addition to this, the Fox News host also blamed social media, porn, video games, and “government-endorsed weed” as contributing factors to the troubled behavior of young men.

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“Look at Robert ‘Bobby’ Crimo,” Carlson said, as a photograph of the suspect appeared on the screen. “Would you sell a gun to that guy? Does he seem like a nutcase? Of course, he does. So why didn’t anyone raise an alarm? Well, maybe because he didn’t stand out. Maybe because there are a lot of young men in America who suddenly look and act a lot like this guy. That’s not an attack; it’s just true,” Carlson said. The Fox host then identified the things in addition to social media, porn, video games, and “government-endorsed weed” that he believes have led to the troubling behavior of these young men.

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“They are numbed by the endless psychotropic drugs that are handed out at every school in the country by crackpots posing as counselors. And, of course, they’re angry. They know that their lives will not be better than their parents’. They’ll be worse,” Carlson said.

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“And yet the authorities in their lives—mostly women—never stop lecturing them about their so-called privilege. ‘You’re male, you’re privileged.’” Carlson imitated. “Imagine that. Try to imagine an unhealthier, unhappier life than that. So a lot of young men in America are going nuts. Are you surprised?”

Returning to the topic of drugs, Carlson said of the males he was describing that “a shockingly large number of them have been prescribed psychotropic drugs by their doctors—SSRIs, or anti-depressants.” “And that would include quite a few mass shooters,” he said, before listing several instances of mass shootings by young males taking prescription drugs. “So is there a connection? Well, we don’t know definitively,” Carlson said. “We do know that there are a whole lot more of these drugs being taken by kids than ever before.”

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Carlson mentioned how Illinois is a state with red flag laws, assault weapons bans, and every other form of gun control. But despite all this, the shooting occurred. He also mentioned how authorities said that they had encountered Crimo twice before. Once in April 2019 after a suicide attempt and a few months later, after he threatened to “kill everyone” in his immediate family. After the second incident, police confiscated knives, a dagger, and a sword from his home. No complaint was filed, and no arrest was made. Authorities did not even follow up after the incident back in 2019.

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Carlson criticized the authorities for their ignorance. "Police didn't think the situation warranted further steps. As we saw, Crimo was still able to buy firearms legally despite being obviously mentally ill," Carlson said. He also pointed out the use of SSRI drugs by teens in the United States that rose by nearly 40 per cent between 2015 and 2019.

You can watch the full video here.

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