Who are Bucket Bunny Housewives? Wives of linemen issue 'hide your husbands' call as Ian relief gets racy

Who are Bucket Bunny Housewives? Wives of linemen issue 'hide your husbands' call as Ian relief gets racy
A bizarre internet trend sees thousands of linemen in Florida being lusted after by local 'bucket bunny' housewives (summerstoli, ohhmtee/TikTok)

A bizarre internet trend is reportedly seeing thousands of linemen who descended on hurricane-stricken Florida being lusted after by local "bucket bunny" housewives.

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Several social media users this past week warned others to hold onto their men as they head down to the Everglade State in the wake of the tragedy, sparking an internet war between the wives of lineworkers -- or linewives -- and thirsty Floridian women. One video showed an altercation between an unidentified woman and a power line technician, with the woman warning his spouse in the clip that he was "hitting" on her.

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"Is this your husband?" the woman is heard saying in the clip posted by TikTok user @kimberlygray11101 this week. "He's down here, in Florida, trying to hit on me," she says as the worker looks on in silence. "He's a linesman. I'm just saying – this is your husband," the woman adds.

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According to the Daily Mail, thousands of scorned spouses took to social media to partake in the growing skirmish, telling fellow wives to look out for predatory housewives whom they dubbed "bucket bunnies." The term reportedly refers to the bucket trucks that lineworkers use to safely reach high-voltage electrical lines that need repair.

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The posts suggest that these single "bunnies" are trying to lure linemen to cheat on their wives, with some sternly warning wayward women to stay away from their spouses. On the other hand, some of the so-called "bucket bunnies" have responded by teasing linewives and professing their lust amid the influx of handsome young workers in town. Many rejoiced their arrival, posting Tinder pictures of the visitors in their neon shirts and construction helmets

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"I stand with all the linemen wives as they prepare to take on Florida's bucket bunnies," one 'pipeline wife' who goes by the TikTok handle @ohhmtee declared in a post that has since garnered millions of views on TikTok. "Blue collar is not a trend, it's a lifestyle," the user added.

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Meanwhile, another spouse said she isn't worried about her partner cheating because he was well aware of the consequences. "I'm pretty sure I can speak for the majority of linewives," @alabama.sisi wrote in a post this week to TikTok, adding, "I promise you the men fear the wrath of their old lady more than anything Hurricane Ian is dishing out right now."

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Some Floridians, however, celebrated the recent arrival of young men since Hurricane Ian made landfall on September 28. "Everyone saying pray for Florida but this is out tinder right now," one user wrote in a viral TikTok slideshow of the lineworkers' Tinder profiles. Others noted how their FYP feed - an acronym standing for 'For Your Page' - was inundated with linemen seemingly looking to take advantage of being in an unfamiliar area to be unfaithful to their spouses. "My entire FYP right now!" another user remarked, adding, "Their tinder bio: here for a good time, not a long time."

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Some internet users appeared to embrace "bucket bunny" as a badge of honor despite the implications of the term. "To the girl that said it the other day, yes - I am a bucket bunny," a young woman asserts in a post also shared by @kimberlygray11101. "Yes, thank you for my power," she adds, before loudly proclaiming, "I will bucket-bunny chase all day!"

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It's worth noting that linemen have been working tirelessly throughout the week on relief efforts after the natural disaster that has left more than 100 dead. Officials are still assessing the damage wrought by the hurricane, which made landfall last week on the gulf coast before sweeping across the northern and central regions of the state.

People walk along the beach looking at property damaged by Hurricane Ian on September 29, 2022 in Bonita Springs, Florida. The storm made a U.S. landfall on Cayo Costa, Florida, and brought high winds, storm surges, and rain to the area causing severe damage.
People walk along the beach looking at property damaged by Hurricane Ian on September 29 in Bonita Springs, Florida (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

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More than 20,000 Floridians remained without power as of Sunday, October 9.

This article contains remarks made on the Internet by individual people and organizations. MEAWW cannot confirm them independently and does not support claims or opinions being made online. 

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