DC's 'Birds of Prey' proves that damaged people don't necessarily equal doom and despair

These women have found a way to rise above their misery and find their inner strength, which they then use to give the Gotham Underworld the beatdown it deserves


                            DC's 'Birds of Prey' proves that damaged people don't necessarily equal doom and despair
Margot Robbie and Ella Jay Basco (IMDb)

This article contains spoilers for 'Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn', also titled 'Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey' in some theaters.

It's gotten to the point where it's a running joke: The Marvel Cinematic Universe is all warmth and positivity and the DC Extended Universe is full of dark and damaged characters. But that doesn't necessarily have to be the case and nothing proves this more than 'Birds of Prey'.

Sure, 'Shazam' and 'Aquaman' were light-hearted family films but the point is that 'Birds of Prey' is cheerful and fun even though it doesn't have to be. Considering the sheer amount of traumatic experiences the movie's main characters, especially Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie) and Huntress / Helena Bertinelli (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) have endured, you'd think this movie would be a lot darker than it actually is. 

But that's the best thing about 'Birds of Prey'. Even the most damaged characters have their moments of awkwardness and humor and just because they're not normal doesn't mean they choose to be inhuman. 

In that respect, 'Birds of Prey' and 'Joker' are two poles apart. Where Todd Phillips's masterpiece shows how trauma and misery lead to chaos and despair, Cath Yan's 'Birds of Prey' is an ode to those who overcome their dysfunction, celebrate it even, and in the process, make the world just a little bit brighter.

None of the movie's dashing heroines have gone through life unscathed. Even Cassandra Cain (Ella Jay Basco), the youngest of the bunch, has faced hardships and pain. But with each other's help, these women have found a way to rise above their misery and find their inner strength. Which they then use to give the Gotham Underworld the beatdown it deserves.

'Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)' was released in theaters on February 7.

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