Why is 'Respect Jungkook' trending? OT6 ARMY slammed as youngest BTS star gets hate

Fans of Jungkook list all the times he was sent immense hate over the years


                            Why is 'Respect Jungkook' trending? OT6 ARMY slammed as youngest BTS star gets hate
The last straw for fans seemed to be when Jungkook was reprimanded for meeting Jay Park (BTS/Weverse)
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While BTS is arguably the biggest boy group in the world and is much loved by fans all over, there tends to be friction within the fandom due to some types of fans. In fact, just a few weeks ago, BTS’ V was sent death threats by those who romantically ‘shipped’ Jungkook and Jimin together. And now, with Jungkook getting immense hate, fans have taken to social media to trend ‘Respect Jungkook’.

With several incidents taking place back to back, frustrated ARMY decided to call out OT6 fans (those who support only six of the seven members of BTS) who have often sent hate to Jungkook and have demanded that he leave BTS. On April 26, ARMY decided to list all of the times the youngest member had been cyberbullied and slammed such toxic fans for doing so.

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Fans tired of the hate Jungkook received

For those BTS fans who felt that Jungkook’s fans were overreacting and that he had never been sent hate, many have brought receipts like the time OT6 fans had asked Jungkook to leave after BTS’ cover of Rain’s ‘Rainism’ in 2016. Another moment fans felt Jungkook got extreme hate was when OT6 fans felt he had the most parts in the song ‘I Need U’. It seems he even saw it as he did not come online for half a year.

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Since then, toxic fans have continued to send hate as evident when they mocked him for liking Justin Bieber’s song ‘Yummy’ or when his webtoon character in ‘7Fates: Chakho’ was allegedly gay. Some ARMY also ended up cyberbullying him when he was recently seen taking a photo with Jay Park who is deemed problematic by many K-pop fans for cultural appropriation.

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‘Absolutely no excuse for this’

A fan of Jungkook made a lengthy post on Weibo of all the times he was cyberbullied by ARMY which ended up trending on Twitter on April 26. Trending the hashtag #RespectJungkook, one ARMY tweeted, “Never forget when armys trended for 🐰 leave bts and started a ot6 moviment against him after rainism performance. he was still a minor, he took months away from sns, imagine how sad he was seeing all this? he don't deserve all this hate from his own ‘fans’.”

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Another fan shared screenshots, “Armys in the quotes saying this is a lie why are yall trying to deny the amount of hate he got and acting like it never happened? the same one who cursed jk under his own tweet despite him going through rough times back in 2019 too with all the smear campaigns.” One posted, “When army trend the army confession day and start their hating stories on JK because of d*mb reasons.” Another added, “The jk things they made fun of and sent him hate for, for which he went ia: - wearing athlete socks - listening to jb - calling his dog ugly - making fun of his ’97 line friends - him having a few lines more as a main vocalist. just let him be, once and for all.”

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One ARMy shared the hate Jungkook got for meeting Jay Park, “We’re not even exaggerating when we say the fandom are his BIGGEST antis. there’s absolutely no excuse for this.” Another brought tweets which showed OT6 fans hating the ‘Rainism’ performance, “Not #them in qrts denying everything when these are just a few things some armys said that day after the rainism performance, the same passive-aggressive comments against JK they keep saying to this day, discrediting him and his position as the main vocalist & center of the group.”

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This article contains remarks made on the Internet by individual people and organizations. MEAWW cannot confirm them independently and does not support claims or opinions being made online.