'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt' 4B: Carol Kane reveals why happy endings don't always need to involve someone else

With Ellie Kemper playing the titular role, 'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt' has been able to address issues like sexual abuse, abduction, and PTSD, all with a humorous twist.


                            'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt' 4B: Carol Kane reveals why happy endings don't always need to involve someone else

Spoilers for ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ season 4B ahead.

The TV show equivalent of sunshine and rainbows, Netflix’s ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ has come to an end with the second half of season 4B, which premiered on January 25. With the ever-pleasant Ellie Kemper playing the titular role of Kimmy, the show has addressed many important and severe issues – from sexual abuse to abduction to PTSD - with a humorous twist.

Over the course of four seasons, we fell in love with four people – Titus (Tituss Burgess), Lillian (Carol Kane), Jacqueline (Jane Krakowski) and Kimmy Schmidt (Kemper) – with four distinct personalities, who overcame their individual struggles and became a family in the process. None of them have a family in the traditional sense of the word, and they leaned on each other to fill that hole.

As Kane tells MEAWW, “They're good people, and they don't a have traditional family. None of them have fit into the traditional mold of what a family is, but they have become a family and that is as legitimate and as important. You don't have to be born with the same blood to be family.”

Over the course of four seasons, we fell in love with four people – Titus, Lillian, Jacqueline and Kimmy –  who overcame their individual struggles and became a family in the process. (Twitter)
Over the course of four seasons, we fell in love with four people – Titus, Lillian, Jacqueline and Kimmy –  who overcame their individual struggles and became a family in the process. (Twitter)

It is this sense of family that gave Titus the strength to open up about his abuse, Kimmy to find her place in the world despite being locked away for 15 years, Jacqueline to become her own woman after depending on her sugar daddy of a husband for many years, and Lillian to continue fighting for what she believes in long after losing many loved ones. In the end, though, it was the ability of ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ to show that a happily ever after does not require a romantic partner that surprised us the most.

“I believe a million percent in the importance of that kind of happiness because you know, we don't always get accepted by other people all the time and that doesn't mean that you should have a life that is less than,” says Kane, who is 100 per cent happy with how the show ended for Kimmy. “Find acceptance for yourself within yourself and follow a certain individual passion like how Kimmy eventually became a writer, and told her story and felt good about being able to offer people her story in order to help them. What could someone be prouder of than that?”

 

She adds, “Not everyone gets the perfect partner or the perfect - a blood family. But that doesn't mean you can't make your own life or feel enriched and you can't have a family made up of people that you meet along your journey. Those families are equally important.  You may not have a partner but you could partner up with your thoughts and feelings and your generosity. You can give something to the world even if you don't get the perfect boyfriend or girlfriend or husband or wife.”

There are many different ways of being successful as a human being, and that is the real lesson in ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,’ if you are looking for one. The finale season really gathered up all the loose storylines from the previous seasons, and tied them into a perfect bow, without falling into any stereotypical tropes.

Season 4B was a perfect goodbye for the fans, and while there definitely were many more stories that could have been told about the awesome foursome, we sure are glad Tina Fey and Robert Carlock were able to end the show on their own terms, with storylines that made sense to the characters.