'Suits' season 8: Here's why the show needs to bow out before it gets worse

Enough of lawyers walking into beautifully decorated skyscraper offices and slapping down folders. Even though Mike's rinse and repeat prison arc is gone, it is still a stretch.

'Suits' season 8: Here's why the show needs to bow out before it gets worse

It appears as though the creators of 'Suits' have decided not to end the series, no matter who walks out. At the end of season seven, Rachel Zane and her husband Mike Ross exited 'Suits' settle down in Seattle. Even though it didn't really seem necessary, it was, however, inevitable.

The show had to somehow accommodate Meghan Markle's royal goodbye into the plot without hurting Pearson Specter Litt. They succeeded, too, to some extent; the show did get bigger and better. If anything, it actually looks quite more promising than any of its former seasons.

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Harvey and the firm's habit of stirring trouble are seven seasons old, but what really stands out about season eight in spite of how the plot is about Harvey and his circle and how powerful the women of 'Suits' are. Particularly interesting is the character of Samantha Wheeler, portrayed by Katherine Heigl. She's slick, resourceful and extremely intelligent - she's like the female equivalent of Harvey Specter. Jessica Pearson was one character stronger than Harvey, and her loss was quite evident throughout season seven. There's no sign Heigl's of the designated bridesmaid persona. She's very believable as Sam, the woman, who is so good at her job, she's always assumed to be a man. 

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'Suits' has finally gone back to the show we have always loved - the shrewd and smart law firm drama with a hint of sexual tension, a dollop of strained aggressiveness, and a whole lot of drama. So, why not let a good thing continue? Simply because less is always more. 

Let's go back to the time in 2015 when Priyanka Chopra starrer 'Quantico' aired. It's two seasons out of the three performed off the charts. Seeing an opportunity, the creators went with another season for the swanky FBI drama. The result? It fizzled out in the worst way possible - no one even remembered when the finale was. While there were other factors that led to the show's downfall as well, this one attribute of milking the cow till everyone is allergic to dairy was the most prominent.

If things had wrapped up by season 2, we would have still looked back on the uniquely fast-paced, cliffhanger of a show and remembered some good bits. That's the critical part about storytelling on television - one bad season and everything else gets overshadowed. The time taken to establish a character, build the story and watch it unfurl is only effective as long as it is precise - one episode more, and it's a drag. With 'Suits' it does feel a little like 'Quantico.'

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Let's take the central story arc on the show - the Harvey Specter is a troubled man thread. In the last season, he falls in love with someone and has a chance of happiness. He ruins it later, quite unsurprisingly, but this incident does bring a sort of closure to the character. We hadn't really seen him go head-on into women unless of course, it involved Donna Paulson (Remember Scottie?). Donna and Harvey shared a kiss in the last season, sealing the fate of their love angle that we had been craving some closure for. That too, came full circle. Hell, even Louis Litt ended up with the love of his life Sheila! It was like when ABC took it too far with Alex Parrish and Ryan Booth's love angle.

They too like 'Suits' introduced a new character - that of Jocelyn Turner (Marlee Maitlyn). While Turner was one of the fresh things on the show, it was unfair to her character - there was just not enough time. We were too wrapped up in the other parallels to the story, and she drowned in the noise in spite of her shining performance. The situation feels only too familiar with Samantha Wheeler, doesn't it?

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While we do love the drama, these things get old too fast. Who wouldn't love to watch a bunch of efficient lawyers making the whole thing look so easy, sipping on booze at work and saying the best catchphrases? The question is, just how much of it can you watch over and over again? There's nothing new about the story so far - except there's a new girl in town. Is that enough? I'm almost certain it is not. Quite like 'The Big Bang Theory,' where the jokes became tired, and laughterless after a run of ten extremely long seasons, 'Suits' is starting to feel like a vicious cycle of backhanded deals, Harvey yelling, "Why didn't you tell me before?" and someone being mean to Litt. 

To be honest, as a fan what I would really like to see 'Suits' bow out - not because I don't love the show but simply because I'd like to still love it when it ends. Enough of lawyers walking into beautifully decorated skyscraper offices and slapping down folders.

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Even though Mike's rinse and repeat prison arc is gone, it is still a stretch. Unlike a show with a strong plot, 'Suits' is a show about strong characters. Right from day 1, Mike Ross' and Harvey Specter's relationship had been the basis of the protagonist's character.  It was such a crucial element to the story - the troubled mentor teaching the innocent boy tricks of the trade. The innocent boy has his own fraudulent secrets, but that doesn't stop ruthless lawyer Specter from taking Mike under his wing. It almost feels like he sees himself in Mike. By season 6 itself, this relationship had been getting rocky. Mike was also crying and complaining about things not going his way the whole time. So while the exit is welcome, the overstay isn't.

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