Stan Lee posts emotional Twitter message amid reports of a billion dollar legal battle

A new report surfaced this week, claiming that Lee has filed a $1 billion lawsuit against POW! Entertainment, a company that he co-founded, over fraud and conversion charges

Stan Lee posts emotional Twitter message amid reports of a billion dollar legal battle

In the recent past, Marvel Comics creator Stan Lee has found himself at the center of multiple controversies. The most recent one being the question about his real identity on social media, to be specific on Twitter.    

The legendary comics writer enjoys a fan-following of over 3 million on the micro-blogging site. Hence when Lee recently took to the site to announce that his social media accounts were hijacked by someone, his loyal fans were left confused, to say the least. 

"Help! Someone has hijacked my Facebook and Instagram," he shared adding, "I want everyone to know whoever is writing them is a fraud and is impersonating me. How do I get them back? Can you guys help?"



Having shared a few more tweets addressed to his fandom, however, the 95-year-old writer-producer finally made an appearance in a video message, thanking fans and finally refuting all confusions over his Twitter handle. 

Lee says in the video, "I just want to tell you that I love your comments on Twitter. I don't know how much I've been missing now that I see them, and I just want you to know I appreciate everything that you say and do. I love you all and let's keep up this great relationship. Excelsior!" 

While the comic icon's emotional message came as a relief to many of his concerned fans, his share of troubles is far from being over. 



In fact, a new report surfaced this week, claiming that Lee has filed a $1 billion lawsuit against POW! Entertainment, a company that he co-founded, over fraud and conversion charges. 

In the legal documents, Lee has accused the company's CEO Shane Duffy and co-founder Champion Gill of stealing his identity, name, and likeness in regards to a "sham" deal with a Chinese company. 

"Lee does not recall anyone reading the Illegitimate Document to him, and, due to his advanced macular degeneration, he could not have read it himself," attorney Adam Grant mentions on behalf of Lee in the complaint.

"While the Illegitimate Document purports to contain Lee's signature, Lee never knowingly signed it. Either Duffy, Champion, Oliveraz [sic] or POW! (1) forged Lee's signatures; (2) lifted Lee's signature from another document and imposed it on the Illegitimate Document;  or, (3) someone, likely one of the Defendants, induced Lee to sign the Illegitimate Document by using a bait and switch tactic: telling Lee it was something else," the lawsuit further mentioned.