Monica Lewinsky could head to the Australian Outback after talks to join ITV's 'I'm a Celebrity'

Following the massive controversies of the '90s which almost once made her 'suicidal,' Lewinsky is now on her way to brave the way of the world.


                            Monica Lewinsky could head to the Australian Outback after talks to join ITV's 'I'm a Celebrity'

Monica Lewinsky is reportedly in talks with the makers of ITV's hit reality show 'I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here,' reported express.co.uk. The showrunners are apparently in 'advanced discussion' with Lewinsky, to sign her up for the Australian outback.

She is believed to be pretty excited about being part of the show that would abandon 12 celebrities in the Australian jungle where they are compelled to perform Bushtucker Trials in order to earn food. 

"Monica now has a platform on which to speak about bullying, particularly in a digital age - that's why she agreed to explore being on the show. Plus, of course, the money being offered is very, very attractive," The Sun quoted a source as saying. If reports are to believed then through this show, Lewinsky will be coming back on a public platform, almost 20 years after the scandal.

Lewinsky sparked massive media controversies back in 1998 regarding her affair with Bill Clinton. (Getty Images)
Lewinsky sparked massive media controversies back in 1998 regarding her affair with Bill Clinton. (Getty Images)

 

However, Lewinsky, now a writer and a motivational speaker, has shut down all the claims with this tweet:



 

Lewinsky, a White House intern in 1998, made headlines when the news of her sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton was made public. She had joined Clinton's Chief of Staff Leon Panetta as an intern, a position she reportedly landed through an apparent family connection. Their affair reportedly started in 1995 and continued till 1997. Prior to the news breaking, Lewinsky, who was by then transferred to a job at Pentagon, revealed about her secret affair to co-worker Linda Tripp.

Although Clinton outrightly denied having any sexual relationship with "Ms. Lewinsky," at that time, he, however, admitted to having an "inappropriate intimate physical contact" with his intern, months later. In the wake of this scandal, he was impeached on charges of lying under oath and obstruction of justice.

After the scandal, Lewinsky reportedly kept a low-profile for years before sitting down for her internet-shattering interview Vanity Fair in 2014, during which she opened up about the aftermath of the affair and revealed that the humiliation almost left her suicidal. "Let me say it again: I. Myself. Deeply. Regret. What. Happened. [My mother] was replaying those weeks when she stayed by my bed, night after night, because I, too, was suicidal. The shame, the scorn, and the fear that had been thrown at her daughter left her afraid that I would take my own life – a fear that I would be humiliated to death."

She was swept by media storm which accused her of single-handedly being responsible for bringing down the Clinton administration.