Michelle Obama makes bold statement in $4,000 glittery thigh-high Balenciaga boots and bright yellow gown

The former First Lady dazzled the crowds watching her on the final stop of her book tour, where she gave an interview to 'Sex and the City' star Sarah Jessica Parker


                            Michelle Obama makes bold statement in $4,000 glittery thigh-high Balenciaga boots and bright yellow gown

Michelle Obama's fashion quotient is on an all-time high! The former First Lady dazzled the crowds watching her on the final stop of her book tour, where she gave an interview to 'Sex and the City' star Sarah Jessica Parker.

Obama arrived at the venue rocking a pair of $4,000 glittery thigh-high Balenciaga boots and set the mood straight with her striking yellow Balenciaga gown. The former First lady packed out the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Wednesday night in her chic Spring/Summer 2019 ready-to-wear collection outfit (that is not yet available), where Parker interviewed her about her new book, 'Becoming'.

Michelle Obama arrived at the venue rocking a pair of $4,000 glittery thigh-high Balenciaga boots and set the mood straight with her striking yellow Balenciaga gown. (Getty Images)
Michelle Obama arrived at the venue rocking a pair of $4,000 glittery thigh-high Balenciaga boots and set the mood straight with her striking yellow Balenciaga gown. (Getty Images)

During her interview, Obama spoke at length about the decisions behind the outfits that made headlines during her time as the FLOTUS. It is quite common knowledge that Obama became a powerful influence in fashion during her eight years as the first lady, for at the time, she could wear a dress and it would sell out hours after she wore it.

During the interview, Obama explained how she knew, as a woman, that her clothes would be heavily dissected and mentioned no matter how weighty the topic she was talking about. "I did know that my clothes were making a statement, I knew that was the case," she said.

Former president Barack Obama and former first Lady Michelle Obama enter the East Room for entertainment after a black-tie dinner at the White House on February 22, 2009 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mike Theiler-Pool/Getty Images)
Former president Barack Obama and former first Lady Michelle Obama enter the East Room for entertainment after a black-tie dinner at the White House on February 22, 2009 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mike Theiler-Pool/Getty Images)

"So we decided why don't we use this platform to uplift some young new designers who normally wouldn't get this kind of attention, because you can change their lives, which is one of the reasons why we chose Jason Wu for my inaugural gown." She also admitted that Wu was clearly taken aback with this, unlike a lot of other designers who felt as if they should have the honor. She further explained, "You learn that there are people in this scene who feel entitled to these things because they've done it for a while, and I hated that feeling. There are a whole lot of people out there who are trying to make it, there are young women and immigrants and black folk."

Former first lady Michelle Obama (L) in conversation with Sarah Jessica Parker at Barclays Center on December 19, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)
Former first lady Michelle Obama (L) in conversation with Sarah Jessica Parker at Barclays Center on December 19, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images)

The accomplished author also revealed how the personal energy of a designer also played a huge role. "I didn't want to wear the clothes of someone who didn't have a good spirit, and you could hear these things, you could hear how they treated my staff or how they treated their works, so, everyone I wore, as far as I knew, had a good spirit as well," she said. During her conversations, she also managed to take a subtle dig at President Trump and the Trump administration. She said that as the first black president of the United States, former President Barack Obama and his staff had a feeling that there was no room for mistakes. 

Former U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama and former U.S. President Barack Obama wait on the North Portico for the arrival of Chinese President Xi Jinping and his wife Madame Peng Liyuan ahead of a state dinner at the White House September 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Former U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama and former U.S. President Barack Obama wait on the North Portico for the arrival of Chinese President Xi Jinping and his wife Madame Peng Liyuan ahead of a state dinner at the White House September 25, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

"Often time, when you're the first or the only, the bar shifts a lot, right? The bar gets set, you meet it, exceed it, they move the bar, and we are watching that right now - the bar's just swinging, and swinging," she said, to the laughter of the audience. "It's a totally new bar - never seen this bar before, ever," she added. "But when we're in office, our bar was very different - not getting indicted, and telling the truth." And then, later, in a manner of joking, she told the audience, "This is going to be reported on - 'Michelle Obama throwing shade'." She said to more laughter, "These are just facts!"

From left, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, former President Barack Obama, former first lady Michelle Obama, former President Bill Clinton, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and former President Jimmy Carter listen as former Sen. Alan Simpson, R-Wyo., speaks during the state funeral for former U.S. President George H. W. Bush at the Washington National Cathedral on December 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Brandon - Pool/Getty Images)
From left, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, former President Barack Obama, former first lady Michelle Obama, former President Bill Clinton, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and former President Jimmy Carter listen as former Sen. Alan Simpson, R-Wyo., speaks during the state funeral for former U.S. President George H. W. Bush at the Washington National Cathedral on December 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Brandon - Pool/Getty Images)