Meghan bans Harry from visiting Charles after coronavirus diagnosis: 'She does not want him to travel right now'

According to an insider, the couple is frustrated because they are doers and want to do so much more to help him


                            Meghan bans Harry from visiting Charles after coronavirus diagnosis: 'She does not want him to travel right now'
(Getty Images)
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Prince Harry has been forbidden by his wife, Meghan Markle, from leaving Canada under any circumstances, even if that includes visiting his father Prince Charles in the UK who was diagnosed with novel coronavirus on March 24. 

The 71-year-old future king tested positive two weeks after meeting Prince Albert II of Monaco, who tested positive for the infection last week.

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Representatives of the royal said in a statement that Queen's Elizabeth's eldest son was currently in self-isolation at the Balmoral estate in Scotland with his wife Camilla Parker Bowles. 

Although Prince Harry had contacted his father after the diagnosis, an insider said that the former 'Suits' actress told Harry that "under no circumstances, is she okay with him traveling anywhere right now."

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"Meghan said Harry's been in touch with his dad ... Of course, he's frustrated. She said they both are frustrated because they are doers and want to do so much more to help," the source added, Daily Mail reported. 

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Members of Britain's Royal family leave after attending the Commonwealth Service at Westminster Abbey in London, Monday, March 11, 2019  (Kirsty Wigglesworth/Getty Images)

The last time that Harry was seen in the public with the Prince of Wales was at the annual Commonwealth Service at Westminster Abbey in London earlier this month. Later, he flew back to Canada to rejoin his wife and son, just weeks before the pandemic lockdown across the globe. 

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As the coupe maintains all the necessary precautions to keep the virus at bay - even ordering their staff to wear latex gloves - Meghan reportedly told her inner circle of friends that Harry felt "helpless" and was concerned about the health status of his father and the Queen, 93, who has not shown any symptom for coronavirus so far.

"Meghan told her inner circle of friends that Harry has been communicating with Prince William and the Queen on a pretty consistent basis. She said this world crisis has actually brought them all closer together, especially Harry and his brother. Harry has made it very clear to them that he will do whatever he can to help from Canada. Meghan said they are grateful, especially Harry, that they could spend time with his family before all this insanity began," an insider said. 

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Meanwhile, the couple is doing all that they can to help out while maintaining social distancing during the social distancing. The pair, who already have two rescue dogs - a beagle named Guy and a Labrador-shepherd mix called Bogart - as well as a black lab, believed to be named Oz, Meghan is looking to adopt another pet to help ease the strain on local animal shelters and rescue groups.

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Meghan meets a Jack Russell called 'Minnie' during her visit to the Mayhew, an animal welfare charity on January 16, 2019 in London (Getty Images)

"Meghan said they were originally interested in a three-month-old mixed breed puppy named Panda, but are now looking at a slightly older black lab named Cole, who is really good with young kids and other dogs. Meghan said they have plenty of space and it wouldn't be a problem," the source said.

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She has also urged her friends to follow her footsteps and foster some animals. 

Harry and Meghan are also reportedly working on helping those suffering from mental health issues due to the pandemic. "Meghan told her inner circle that what's happening in the world right now is a mental health crisis. She said they are working with a mental health non-profit to create some sort of online support system for those most vulnerable, like new mothers suffering from postpartum depression. People who lack support systems need reassurance that they are not alone," a source said.

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