Meghan Markle deserves 'some sort of intervention' after 'nonsensical' interview, says royal expert

The royal expert fact-checked Meghan before saying, 'there's a lot of stuff coming out that I think people in the States are believing. It's just nonsense'

Meghan Markle deserves 'some sort of intervention' after 'nonsensical' interview, says royal expert
Meghan Markle gave another bombshell interview, this time to the New York Magazine's 'The Cut' (Photo by Dominic Lipinski - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
ADVERTISEMENT

Meghan Markle has recently caused a stir in the media after her recent interview ran just two days before Princess Diana's 25th death anniversary. In the interview, Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, made a number of controversial statements. One of them was about picking up Archie from school or dropping him off at the bus stop in the UK and how she would be faced by a "press pen of 40 people shooting pictures."

ADVERTISEMENT

The Cut quoted the Duchess of Sussex saying, "Sorry, I have a problem with that. That doesn't make me obsessed with privacy. That makes me a strong and good parent protecting my child." In response to the statement, Robert Jobson, a representative of the royal family, thought that Markle can benefit from a "intervention" after pointing out how inaccurate she was when she made that statement.

ADVERTISEMENT

READ MORE

Mystery of Meghan Markle's 'Nelson Mandela' comment deepens after actor John Kani denies EVER meeting her

Kate Middleton praised for her 'grace' despite 'narcissist' Meghan Markle's attacks

ADVERTISEMENT

Jobson remarked, "I think that some of this stuff is just so nonsensical, so untrue that there should be some sort of intervention," in an interview with Sunrise, an Australian morning show. "Nobody in these interviews is picking her up on these claims and saying, 'where are you getting them from?'"

ADVERTISEMENT



 

"There's one claim about her children that if she had taken the kids to school in the UK, there would be 40 press outside every day pursuing them," Jobson added. "In America, they believe in this stuff but in truth, there are rules here set by the press that they're not allowed to do that."

ADVERTISEMENT

"You're not allowed to have people outside the school and they would be moved along so, that isn't true. There will be a set one for the first day of school and that will be it," Jobson said. "There's a lot of stuff coming out that I think people in the States are believing. It's just nonsense."

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor meet Archbishop Desmond Tutu at the Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019 in Cape Town, South Africa.
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor photographed during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Toby Melville - Pool/Getty Images)

ADVERTISEMENT

Photographing kids at school is forbidden by the Editors' Code of Practice, which outlines standards that publications governed by IPSO, notably newspapers and magazines, have pledged to uphold. British media members took pictures of Prince George and Princess Charlotte on their first days of school as part of a scheduled photo call that had the Cambridge family's and the school's approval.

ADVERTISEMENT

Markle seemed to reveal in other parts of the conversation that the media had used the "N-word" to refer to her kids. She spoke about the royal schedule, the well-known press arrangement that covers important events involving the monarchy. "Why would I give the very people that are calling my children the N-word a photo of my child before I can share it with the people that love my child? You tell me how that makes sense and then I'll play that game," Markle said. Watch the Australian morning show Sunrise coverage of Meghan's interview below:

ADVERTISEMENT



 

ADVERTISEMENT

Share this article: Meghan Markle deserves 'some sort of intervention' after 'nonsensical' interview, says royal expert