Liam Neeson denies being racist for admitting he wanted to kill a random black man after his friend was raped by one

The star recalled how he had gone to his Catholic church when he became 'scared' and realized he had wanted to 'unleash' death on a stranger for his friend


                            Liam Neeson denies being racist for admitting he wanted to kill a random black man after his friend was raped by one

Liam Neeson has denied being racist but also failed to apologize for admitting to the media that he once wanted to kill a random black man after finding out that one of his friends had been raped by one. The 66-year-old appeared on 'Good Morning America' in New York when he made the brash comments on air.

The actor revealed that he had once sought help from a priest after spending a week prowling the streets with a cosh to murder a "black b*****d". In his defense, the prolific actor said he "understood" the hurt his words may have caused but insisted that he was not a racist man, as reported by the Daily Mail.

Liam Neeson attends the 2018 Arthur Miller Foundation Honors at City Winery on October 22, 2018, in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)
Liam Neeson attends the 2018 Arthur Miller Foundation Honors at City Winery on October 22, 2018, in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

He said, "I'm not racist, this was 40 years ago. I had a primal urge. I was trying to show honor for a friend I dearly loved in a medieval fashion." The star also recalled how he had gone to his Catholic church when he became "scared" and realized he had wanted to "unleash" death on a stranger for his friend, who passed away five years ago.

Orlando Bloom and Liam Neeson attend the 11th Annual UNICEF Snowflake Ball at Cipriani, Wall Street on December 1, 2015, in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)
Orlando Bloom and Liam Neeson attend the 11th Annual UNICEF Snowflake Ball at Cipriani, Wall Street on December 1, 2015, in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)

He said: "I did seek help. I went to a priest, who heard my confession and also later confided in two friends while out powerwalking." It was then that GMA host Robins Roberts asked him if he "understood the pain of a black person."

Neeson replied, "Absolutely, you're absolutely right. And at the time, even though this was nearly 40 years ago, I didn't think about that. It was this primal hatred, I guess, that really shocked me, when I eventually came down to earth and saw what I was doing, looking for a fight."

The actor was then asked what his plan of action would have been if his friend's attacker was a white man instead, to which he replied, "If he was Irish, a Scot or Brit or a Lithuanian. I know I would have had the same reaction."

Liam Neeson attends a Q&A at the New York Screening of 'Silence' at Regal E-Walk Theater on December 8, 2016, in New York City. (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)
Liam Neeson attends a Q&A at the New York Screening of 'Silence' at Regal E-Walk Theater on December 8, 2016, in New York City. (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)

The actor's shocking story sparked widespread social media outrage against him with people slamming the actor, who had previously spoken in favor of women's pay equality and gay marriage in Northern Ireland, for racism. Neeson, whose critics have already raised concern over allowing him at the Oscars and making movies, further revealed that his anger came from all the murders he saw around him from his time in Northern Ireland.

Neeson also said that he chose to speak out now to encourage others "to talk, to open up, to talk about these things — we all pretend we're all politically correct." He revealed the astonishing life story while discussing his latest movie, 'Cold Pursuit', which is about a father's quest for revenge against a drug baron after his son is killed.

Liam Neeson visits kids at Ronald McDonald House on December 19, 2017, in New York City. (Photo by Monica Schipper/Getty Images)
Liam Neeson visits kids at Ronald McDonald House on December 19, 2017, in New York City. (Photo by Monica Schipper/Getty Images)