Flooded Las Vegas casinos go viral as city hit with RARE heavy rain and thunderstorm

Videos and photos shared on social media showed water pouring through ceilings of buildings while people struggled with the unfavorable weather


                            Flooded Las Vegas casinos go viral as city hit with RARE heavy rain and thunderstorm
Screenshots showing extreme rain and flood water in Las Vegas (Twitter)
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Las Vegas witnessed severe rain and extreme thunderstorms as multiple casinos and hotels along with airports and parking lots found themselves submerged in flood water. Videos and photos shared on social media showed water pouring through ceilings of buildings while people struggled with the unfavorable weather.

The official Twitter page of the city shared a warning, writing, “A Flash Flood Warning and Severe Thunderstorm Warning has been issued for the Las Vegas Valley ⚠️ @NWSVegas advises to watch out for: - heaving downpours 🌧 - lightning ⚡️ - strong wind gusts 💨 #VegasWeather.” No injuries have been reported yet as confirmed by Las Vegas Fire Information Officer, Tim Szymanski, but footage showed downtown streets looking more like rivers and Circa Sportsbook’s interior exploding with water.

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Other videos showed heavy downpour inside Planet Hollywood Casino as baffled staff members captured the havoc on their phones. The floodwater did not spare Caesar’s Palace too as clips posted on the internet revealed how the ceilings failed to control it. Alexander Wolf, a Las Vegas resident, told The New York Post, “Lightning was nearly constant, and the power went out several times. Electric surges set the fire alarms of several buildings off, causing fire responders to have to head out into the storm to respond to them.”

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Simon Jowitt, an economic geologist and professor at the University of Las Vegas, said that flash floods are not common in the city but July to September is considered the monsoon season. He added: “We’ve got good drainage systems but sometimes the water just overloads them. It can also be dangerous for homeless people who sometimes live in the drainage systems for shelter. The other thing is that we don’t often get rain so it’s hard to check whether roofs and the like are actually waterproof; probably what has happened in the casinos tonight. These rains don’t happen that often, but we’ve had a few days in a row now.”

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Not just roads and streets, flooding and rain have affected airports and flights too. Flyer Shondra Kayd told The Post: “My flight has been delayed an hour so far and maybe more. A lot of planes had to land at different airports.”

Twitter was filled with reactions to Las Vegas’ harsh weather with a user saying, “It’s happening here and I’m REALLY SCARED AF!!! 🤢🤮.” The second user shared, “Lightning to the north and rain in the Central Valley. C’mon #monsoon2022 #vegasweather #Vegas @KTNV.” “I tell so many people that flat roofs are stupid in the desert because nobody maintains their roofs. The drains get clogged. The roofs dry up and leak. It's all great until it rains then bam,” the third one tweeted.

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Dennis Yu, chief technology officer of BlitzMetrics, posted: “We aborted landing at LAS. Went to LAX and trying again now.” A person wrote: “No excuse for a brand new casino to be leaking.  Expect lawsuits. Circa will sue the architect & builder and they in turn will sue every subcontractor that stepped foot on the project to pay for their screw up. No matter who's at fault. That's our system.” “It is every Nevada residents duty to grab their 5 gallon buckets and a bucket brigade all the way to Lake Mead,” a tweet added.

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