Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand Goop gets slammed for selling potentially harmful products to pregnant women

Goop's Mother Load vitamin supplement packets contain a high amount of vitamin A, which, if taken in a large quantity during pregnancy can lead to birth defects and liver toxicity


                            Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand Goop gets slammed for selling potentially harmful products to pregnant women

Gwyneth Paltrow may be taking a bit of time off from marital bliss, for her beloved lifestyle brand Goop is currently under fire for selling products to pregnant women that may be potentially harmful to them in the long run. The brand, founded by the award-winning actress, has reportedly caught flack for selling a potentially dangerous product to expectant mothers called The Mother Load. The company made headlines in the UK on Sunday, as per reports, for being “reported to British regulators over 113 alleged breaches of UK advertising law,” according to the Sunday Times.

 

Gwyneth Paltrow speaks onstage at the In goop Health Summit at 3Labs on June 9, 2018 in Culver City, California.
Gwyneth Paltrow speaks onstage at the In goop Health Summit at 3Labs on June 9, 2018 in Culver City, California.

According to reports, Goop’s Mother Load vitamin supplement packets have always been marketed toward pregnant women or those wanting to become pregnant. And Babycenter.com has claimed that these supplements contain a high amount of vitamin A, which, if taken in a large quantity during pregnancy can lead to birth defects and liver toxicity. “When used as recommended, Goop’s The Mother Load supplements are safe during pregnancy,” a spokesperson for Goop explained in a statement. “The Mother Load contains a very moderate 450 mcg (1500 IU) of vitamin A (preformed vitamin A as retinyl palmitate), which is less than the recommended daily intake of 600 mcg per day (per NHS).”

 

Goop’s Mother Load vitamin supplement packets have always been marketed toward pregnant women or those wanting to become pregnant. (Source: goop.com)
Goop’s Mother Load vitamin supplement packets have always been marketed toward pregnant women or those wanting to become pregnant. (Source: goop.com)

The statement continued: “The 4000 IU beta-carotene included in Mother Load is only converted in the body to vitamin A as needed, and there is no safety concern for eating this, as there would be no safety concern for eating a large number of carrots containing beta-carotene. The Mother Load package contains a warning that pregnant women should not consume more than 10,000 IU vitamin A daily due to the risk of birth defects.”

The spokesperson noted that the “concern is that pregnant women not consume excessive vitamin A, a key tenet of good nutrition” adding, “moderation is the best policy.” 

Gwyneth Paltrow visits goop-In@Nordstrom for Book Signing on May 19, 2017 in Seattle, Washington.
Gwyneth Paltrow visits goop-In@Nordstrom for Book Signing on May 19, 2017 in Seattle, Washington.

As per another report by the Times, a charity called Good Thinking Society has accused Paltrow “of presiding over a company that issues ‘potentially dangerous’ advice related to ‘unproven’ health products.” In documents obtained for the same, the brand was “forced to pay a $145,000 fine to regulatory authorities in California last month because of unproven health claims.”

It is interesting to note, however, that Goop's Mother Load supplement isn’t recommended by the NHS or the World Health Organisation. Professor Julia Newton-Bishop, a clinician scientist at the University of Leeds told the Times: “I find it absolutely extraordinary that anyone would contemplate selling these kinds of supplements to pregnant women.”