'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: Dr Ebonie hits a snag while treating Brooklyn's webbed toes

Dr Ebonie fears she might have to amputate the patient after an operated toe seems to have no blood supply


                            'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4: Dr Ebonie hits a snag while treating Brooklyn's webbed toes
Dr Ebonie's patient Brooklyn in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 (TLC)
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Dr Ebonie is entrusted with assisting a young patient with webbed toes in the season finale. As she embarks on one of the most grueling procedures in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4, she encounters a scary snag.

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'My Feet Are Killing Me' is a medical documentary that follows Dr Ebonie Vincent, Dr Sarah Haller, and Dr Brad Schaefer as they deal with foot issues. Everything from serious illnesses to aesthetic operations to foot restoration is covered in the show. In each episode, lovely individuals receive treatment to correct unsightly foot ailments, with astounding results. Dr Ebonie meets a patient who faces very difficult challenges due to her webbed toes in the season finale, which aired on July 6.

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Dr Ebonie encounters a 16-year-old patient named Brooklyn Jackson, who has Syndactyly, or webbed toes. In most cases, patients with webbed toes have two toes fused, but Brooklyn has two sets of toes fused in both of her feet. Separating so many toes could lead to separations of the skin, raising the possibility of amputation given the lack of blood supply in the region. Brooklyn travels to Orange County, California with her mother, Alisha, to see Dr Ebonie for a lasting solution.

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The doc examines Brooklyn's x-ray and notices that her toes are quite close together, but the bones are not fused. She has a distinct structure of the toe bone that is separated by a very small region of skin, which means the doctor will have to work hard to separate those. However, it is not impossible, as she is quick to assure the patient. Brooklyn's webbed toes would be separated by Dr Ebonie's surgical plan, which involves separating the second and third toes on the left foot, as well as the fourth and fifth ones. She then plans to do the same with her right foot. Dr Ebonie wants to split Brooklyn's toes and use her own skin to patch up the scar. She does, however, recommend a skin graft, specifically for the toes she would be unable to patch post/during surgery.

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Dr Ebonie explains to Brooklyn that she may end up using fish skin for the graft, assuring her that she would not feel the difference once it heals. Insisting on human skin would mean using Brooklyn's own, which would result in an open wound. Dr Ebonie notes that fish skin is great for skin grafts since it is robust and simpler to sew to the patient's skin. Moreover, fish skin is abundant in omega-3, which is highly beneficial and reduces inflammation. It will ultimately fade once sewn in, and no, Brooklyn would not have scaly toes as a result. The doc claims it would have the same appearance and scent as her toes - nothing fish-y at all.

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Despite the possibility of amputation, Dr Ebonie prepares for the surgery. She begins with the right foot, ensuring that once the skin is separated, it receives blood flow; otherwise, skin cells would fail and the bones will be infected, with the danger of amputation. Toes, according to Dr Ebonie, are unpredictable since they are so little and sensitive. She covers the separated toes with whatever skin she can find, which is a vital moment in the procedure. All skin layers are necessary for healing, and the doctor ensures that they are preserved so that the blood flow may continue.

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Dr Ebonie Vincent in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 (TLC)

Even though the right foot goes smoothly, the doctor encounters a stumbling block when operating on the left foot. She utilized dissolvable sutures to reattach the skin. The fourth and fifth toes were the most difficult since she had to work with less skin. Essentially, she cut the skin, but it was not as malleable as the skin between the other toes. She had to utilize the fish graft for the fifth toe, making sure it wasn't sewed in too tightly or the skin would fail. Once the graft is in place, she deflects the tourniquet to examine if blood is flowing again, but the fifth toe does not appear to be receiving any. The toe becomes white, which is an indication of cut-off blood flow. And if the toe does not receive blood flow for a certain amount of time, it will die, which is the last thing the doc wants. She injects lidocaine into the toe to stimulate blood flow, and it can really open up and expand the vessel to allow blood flow to start and push to the tip of the toe. Dr Ebonie's gentle massage helps the toe reestablish blood flow.

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Even though the operation went successfully, Dr Ebonie adds that Brooklyn is still not out of the woods because she might revert to not having blood flow to her toes and face the same risk. However, Brooklyn shows off her ten different toes with newfound confidence at her three-month follow-up visit.

Before and After Dr. Ebonie's surgery in 'My Feet Are Killing Me' Season 4 (TLC)

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The show hasn't been formally renewed by TLC for a fifth season yet. For further details, check out this space.