'This case is over': Bob Dylan sex abuse lawsuit closed after accuser allegedly destroys evidence

The plaintiff asked the judge to close the case with 'prejudice' after she failed to present evidence to the court


                            'This case is over': Bob Dylan sex abuse lawsuit closed after accuser allegedly destroys evidence
Musician Bob Dylan Performs onstage during the 37th AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Michael Douglas (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for AFI)
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In a shocking turn of events an unnamed woman, who claimed Bob Dylan sexually abused her as a child in 1965, has withdrawn her lawsuit permanently after it was reported that she destroyed key evidence in the case and compromised the integrity of the entire matter. The news of the case getting “permanently closed” comes almost a week after the woman, identified as JC in the court papers, fired her team of lawyers for not doing their work properly.

For the uninitiated, the original lawsuit was filed in August last year and claimed that the iconic singer-songwriter “befriended” the accuser and started gaining her trust. He showed her how big of a celebrity and started meeting her. However, the woman claimed that Dylan introduced the girl to alcohol and drugs and sexually abused her over a six-week period in 1965, which left her “emotionally scarred and psychologically damaged.”

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But the entire case was dismissed on Thursday, July 28, after the plaintiff suddenly stood up during the latest hearing and asked the judge to dismiss the case “with prejudice”. The term has a specific meaning in the courtroom and means that the case will now be closed permanently and the plaintiff won’t be able to refile the case. The shocking announcement comes after the plaintiff failed to submit important texts and emails to the court. The court gave the plaintiff a deadline of July to hand over the pieces of evidence, but she couldn’t do that. Soon after, the plaintiff’s lawyers told the court that they have been fired from the case. As soon as the news surfaced online, its legal team of Dylan blasted the accuser and alleged that she destroyed the messages that could have mattered the most in the case.

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Musician Bob Dylan performs onstage during the 17th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards held at The Hollywood Palladium on January 12, 2012 in Los Angeles, California.
Musician Bob Dylan performs onstage during the 17th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards held at The Hollywood Palladium on January 12, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for VH1)

Speaking after the case getting permanently closed, Dylan’s lead attorney Orin Snyder told Billboard that the entire team is pleased that the plaintiff has chosen to close this “outrageous” case. He added, “This case is over. It is outrageous that it was ever brought in the first place. We are pleased that the plaintiff has dropped this lawyer-driven sham and that the case has been dismissed with prejudice.”

Although the case gathered a lot of steam when the woman came forward, it certainly got really weird once rock experts claimed that the legendary musician was actually in New York for most of April and May 1965. As soon as the word got out, the accuser updated the lawsuit and claimed that the abuse actually took place for “several months in the spring of 1965”.

Things got even worse for the plaintiff and her legal team when it couldn’t produce the materials in court and Dylan’s lead attorney warned JC’s team that they could face “sanctions” if they fail to provide those materials. Days later, the team announced that they have been fired by the accuser.

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Folk singers Joan Baez and Bob Dylan perform during a civil rights rally on August 28, 1963 in Washington D.C.
Folk singers Joan Baez and Bob Dylan perform during a civil rights rally on August 28, 1963 in Washington D.C. (Photo by Rowland Scherman/National Archive/Newsmakers)

If the case would have continued, the woman and her entire legal time would have to pay a hefty fine for not being able to produce the evidence.

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