Amy Barrett hearing: What are 5 freedoms in First Amendment? ACB brutally trolled as she forgets the last one

When Sen. Ben Sasse asked her 'What are the five freedoms of the First Amendment?' Barrett replied, 'Speech, religion, press, assembly. Speech, press, religion, assembly, I don't know, what am I missing?'


                            Amy Barrett hearing: What are 5 freedoms in First Amendment? ACB brutally trolled as she forgets the last one
Amy Berrett (Getty Images)

President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, faced a bit of a hiccup when she was asked to name the five freedoms protected by the First Amendment on the third day of her confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill. 

When Sen. Ben Sasse asked her “What are the five freedoms of the First Amendment?” Barrett replied, “Speech, religion, press, assembly. Speech, press, religion, assembly, I don't know, what am I missing?” laughingly, to which Sasse says, “redress or protest.” Barrett says, “OK” before he moves on to the next question. 

What are the five freedoms in the First Amendment? 

The First Amendment protects several basic freedoms in the United States, including, freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, the right to assemble, and the right to petition the government. It was added to the constitution on December 15, 1791, as a part of the Bill of Rights. 

Freedom of Religion 

This allows people to believe and practice any religion of their choice. It also gives them the freedom to not follow any religion. The government, however, can regulate certain religious practices.  
 
Freedom of Speech 

This freedom prevents the government from restricting people from expressing their opinions.

Freedom of Press

The above freedom allows people to express their opinions and information through different media, including, newspapers, radio, TV, printed pamphlets, or online. 

Right To Assemble 

This guarantees the freedom for a peaceful gathering for public protests, rallies and marches. 

Right to Petition the Government 

This provides the right to ask the government at any level to right a wrong or correct a problem. 

The fact that Barrett struggled to name all the five freedoms in the First Amendment of the US Constitution has the people on the Internet questioning her “qualification” for the role that she’s been picked for by Trump. A vast majority of social media users have expressed disappointment in her for not knowing the constitution well enough despite having served as a law professor and a judge. She was soon subjected to criticism on Twitter, as more and more people took to the micro-blogging platform to mock her for not knowing all the five freedoms. 

One tweeted, "@BenSasse @SenSasse you should seriously consider not voting for #AmyConeyBarrett, if she can’t name the five freedoms and how they are connected. She isn’t the Constitutionalist you all think she is. No more court packing if she is confirmed. #MoscowMitchMcConnell is guilty." Another added, "It’s bad enough that Trump’s SCOTUS nominee , Judge Amy Coney Barrett, couldn’t name all five freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment, but it’s telling that the one that she forgot was protest (redress). Wouldn’t this be in the foundational knowledge of every federal judge?"

One wrote, "So we not gonna talk about how Amy Coney Barrett ain’t know the five freedoms? Babe my 9 year old cousin knows the bill of rights.." Another tweeted, "Amy Coney Barrett is unable to name the five freedoms protected by the First Amendment. Gawd, the bar is low." An angry user tweeted, "Amy Coney Barrett is not ACB. She’s ABC because she’s so damned simple. Not knowing the Five Freedoms? She’s not qualified to be a f**king law clerk, never mind on SCOTUS."



 

 



 

 



 

 



 

 

 



 

If you have a news scoop or an interesting story for us, please reach out at (323) 421-7514