Katie Piper calls James Bulger's mom Denise Fergus inspiring and seeks advice on how to practice general acceptance and to let go

With her new podcast called 'Katie Piper's Extraordinary People', the reality star is all for helping people going through adversity. James Bulger's mom was her first guest.


                            Katie Piper calls James Bulger's mom Denise Fergus inspiring and seeks advice on how to practice general acceptance and to let go

Katie Piper has never really let her acid attack be too far from the headlines, especially since she ditched her right to anonymity after she was burned by acid in 2008 by an accomplice of her ex-boyfriend Daniel Lynch, which literally left her with severe burns and blindness in one eye. The star later turned her horrifying experience into a positive note, and with her new podcast called 'Katie Piper's Extraordinary People', the reality star is all for helping people going through adversity. In an interview with DailyStar, the star spoke of all her guests on the podcasts as her heroes.

She said: “I think these guests, these people on my podcasts. Everyone, I have taken something from their journey, so these are my real kind of real-life heroes.” And the one guest who absolutely stood out for her was the former model’s first guest James Bulger’s mum Denise Fergus. Piper told the media outlet that she specifically chose Denise to learn from because she had lost her two-year-old son after he was abducted from a Merseyside shopping center in 1993 and later murdered, by 10-year-old Robert Thompson and Jon Venables.

 



 

 

The toddler's heartbreaking death shook the entire nation in its wake, and it was exceptionally shocking since the murderers were kids themselves. Little James' abduction was caught clearly on the shopping center's CCTV, and later, both Robert Thompson and Jon Venables were charged with the offense, making them the youngest convicted murderers in modern English history.

The duo spent eight long years serving a sentence in a young offenders detention center, but the sad part for Fergus was that her son's killers never had to serve any time in a proper adult prison.

Denise Fergus, the mother of murdered toddler James Bulger, with her book 'I Let Him Go' during its launch in The Suites Hotel in Knowsley, Merserside. (Photo by Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images)
Denise Fergus, the mother of murdered toddler James Bulger, with her book 'I Let Him Go' during its launch in The Suites Hotel in Knowsley, Merserside. (Photo by Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images)

Opening up about Fergus, Piper said, "How do you practice general acceptance and not be angry, how do you let go?" During her podcast, Piper and Fergus spoke at length about how she dealt with James' death and where she finds the strength to keep fighting, along with her feeling of injustice and the frustration of the right to anonymity by attackers.

When asked if she feels that justice was served in James' case, Piper said, “No, I don’t think they got justice, definitely not and that’s what I really... for me I could have spent so much time talking about it. She [Fergus] didn’t get what you’d expect she’d get but she managed to move forward and not be a bitter angry person.”

 

 

Speaking on the podcast, Piper told Fergus, “You’re fighting the people who we are told are there to protect us, the legal system, the justice system, the courts, the parole board. We are all told in society, you know we all pay our taxes, these are the people that do right by us and actually I suppose you have found that is not always true.”

To which Fergus responded, “Definitely not, I don’t believe for one minute it’s been true in the 25 years that I’ve been fighting, it has always been one-sided. With them two they have always been given the best of everything, they didn’t even go to a proper prison. That’s rewarded not punished. All I wanted was for them to do time in an adult prison and I wouldn’t have had to fight the way I have. At least I would have got some justice.”

 


 
 
 
 
 
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James Patrick Bulger was born on 16 March 1990 and passed away on 12 February 1993 at the age of 2. He was a boy from Kirkby, Merseyside, England. He was abducted, tortured and killed by two ten-year-old boys, Robert Thompson was born on 23 August 1982 and Jon Venables was born on 13 August 1982. - Bulger was led away from the New Strand Shopping Centre in Bootle while his mother took her eyes off him momentarily. His mutilated body was found on a railway line 2.5 miles (4 km) away in Walton, Liverpool, two days after his murder. Thompson and Venables were charged on 20 February 1993 with Bulger's abduction and murder. He was sexually assaulted by the two and was tortured before being killed. Over 30 people saw the boys dragging bloody James and one person stopped them and they used the excuse of he was lost and were taking him to the police station. A couple hours later a group of children founds James body at the rail road tracks split in two as he was hit by a train as planned. - They were found guilty on 24 November 1993, making them the youngest convicted murderers in modern English history. They were sentenced to detention during Her Majesty's pleasure until a Parole Board decision in June 2001 recommended their release on a lifelong licence aged 18. In 2010, Venables was recalled to prison for breaching the terms of his licence, and was released on parole again in 2013. In November 2017, Venables was again sent to prison for breaching his licence by possessing child abuse images on his computer. (James parents do forgive the children due to their age and trauma they were put through while growing up) (the two last picture are of the boys who attacked James and the first is James and his Mother)

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Sharing about her own case, Piper declared: “The fear I live with at the moment, you know we talked about the anxiety. I had my anxiety under control and now I am going through the parole board which obviously you’re so familiar with, the anxiety has come back. The fear of I could bump into them, I don’t know what they look like anymore, I am not allowed to know where they’re gonna live. I’m not allowed to know their new name.”

Further through the conversation, Piper, while asking for advice, said: “How do you cope with that, how can I cope with that?” And Fergus, pulling on her own strength, gave the best reply possible,  “Well it is just something you’ve got to look out for, hopefully, they’ll not put them anywhere near you.”