‘Satan preached here’: Spooky Halloween river in Scotland where water is blood red

‘Satan preached here’: Spooky Halloween river in Scotland where water is blood red
The Devil's Pulpit is a well-known haunt for Halloween fans and surrounds itself with secrets and stories of monsters (Twitter/MattDoogue)

STIRLINGSHIRE, SCOTLAND: According to legend, a blood-red river in Scotland is so disturbing that Satan himself is believed to preach to his disciples while sitting on a nearby rock. In Scotland, the Finnish Glen (or The Devil's Pulpit as it is popularly known) is a popular destination for Halloween enthusiasts, with many legends of monsters and mysteries surrounding it.

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Some even believe that the grassy rock jutting out from the riverbank was once used by ancient druids to transmit messages, while others claim that it was the site of terrible satanic rites. Another legend says that witches used the region to perform rituals and cast spells there.

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Finnich Glen is located near the Loch Lomond waterfront, south of Drymen and north of Craighat. Through a narrow valley in the sandstone, you can see a river flowing below. The path down to the driver is quite treacherous and the descent to the bottom is quite difficult. The Devil's Steps or Jacob's Ladder, built in 1860, was used to describe the descent to the bottom.
The red color of the river has given rise to many legends over the years. Scientists, however, have a very different explanation for the incredibly unique colors that swirl in the waters of Stirlingshire, despite claims that they are supernatural. They claim that the eroded sandstone, alongside the rushing water that flows through the canyon, gives the area its scarlet appearance. When light penetrates the red sandstone beneath the water, it gives the startling impression that the water is blood red.

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However, the Scottish river won't be the only location crowded with Halloween revelers on October 31. Yorkshire, home to 797 confirmed ghost sightings, was recently crowned the UK's most haunted region according to Daily Star

Numerous paranormal occurrences, including headless ladies and scratching noises, fill the area with eerie spirits that wander the region. People who are familiar with the area are not surprised by it because it is dotted with historic sites like cathedrals, abbeys, and cities from long ago.  After being used in 2014 to represent the fictitious St. Ninian's Spring (or Liar's spring) in the time-traveling romantic drama television series Outlander, the Finnish Glen has experienced an upsurge in tourism. It currently receives an estimated 70,000 tourists annually. 

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Other famous spooky places in Scotland for Halloween enthusiasts include the Rosslyn Chapel located in Roslin, Midlothian. This active church, made well-known by the book and film "The Da Vinci Code," was constructed for the Sinclair family in the fourteenth century. When a Sinclair is ready to pass away, it is said that spectral flames glow in the chapel's burial crypt. Additionally, a ghost of the apprentice who carved the infamous Apprentice Pillar and was later killed by his master has been said to visit the building.

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Other popular places are Culloden Moor in Inverness and Stirling castle in Stirling which are full of legends of ghosts and apparitions. 

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