Did Ukraine really replace road signs to say 'Go F**k Yourself'? Truth behind viral pics

'The enemy has a miserable connection, they are not guided by the terrain. Let's help them get straight to hell'


                            Did Ukraine really replace road signs to say 'Go F**k Yourself'? Truth behind viral pics
A road sign in Ukraine saying 'Go F**k Yourself' to Russian troops (Facebook/Ukravtodor)
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The photo of a Ukrainian road sign reading "Go F**k Yourself" has been doing rounds on social media, as it is being reported that the administration is 'updating' road signs to send a message to the Russian soldiers. However, not the entire claim happens to be true. While a Ukrainian road company is indeed removing crucial road signs and names to confuse Russian troops, the "Go F**K Yourself" message was a suggestion shared by Ukravtodor, the company which manages Ukraine's road system. 

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In a Facebook post on February 26, Ukravtodor shared an edited photo that showed messages like "Go F**k Yourself" and "Go f**k yourself again" and "Go f**k yourself back in Russia." They wrote, "URGENTLY We dismantle road signs on all roads of the country. Priority #1 — signs, names of settlements. We pass the collected signs to local authorities and road workers. The enemy has a miserable connection, they are not guided by the terrain. Let's help them get straight to hell."

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"Ukravtodor calls on all road organizations, territorial communities, local self-government bodies to immediately begin dismantling road signs nearby. NEHUI SHASTATY (Don't you f*** around)" the post further noted.


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The announcement prompted Ukrainians to alter or remove road signs as a foolproof strategy to stall Russian advances in their cities. On February 27, Russian troops took over the port city of Berdyansk near the Sea of Azov. They are also unleashing brutal warfare tactics to penetrate other Ukrainian towns and cities, particularly the capital city of Kyiv. 

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The post sparked huge appreciation among foreign nationals who lauded Ukraine's patriotism and courage in the face of Russian invasion. The inspiration for the 'Go F*** Yourself' photo perhaps came from the thirteen brave soldiers of the remote Snake Island, who told the Russian navy to go 'f**k' themselves before a vicious bout of bombing from the latter's end.

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The video of them muttering the phrase for Russians also went viral on social media globally. Much to the delight and surprise of their fellow countrymen, the thirteen soldiers were found to be alive and well on February 28.

In another 'badass' instance from bravery from a Ukrainian, a man from Berdyansk was seen moving a land mine from the middle of the road with his bare hands, while casually puffing on a cigarette. He was hailed as a hero on social media for risking his own life to save others around him. 

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In the past few days, Ukraine saw civilians turning into heroes overnight, as one woman confronted Russian soldiers and asked them to "Put sunflower seeds in your pockets so they grow on Ukraine soil when you die." Marine soldier Vitali Shakun made the ultimate sacrifice by blowing himself up along with a bridge, simply to buy some time for his battalion to regroup before Russian soldiers arrived. Another 80-year-old man was lauded for enlisting in the army to protect his grandkids. 
 
 

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