'The Passage': Here's what to expect from the upcoming Fox series based on Justin Cronin's best-selling apocalyptic novel

While there's speculation about how much of the book we are going to witness on screen, here's a little surprise: the story in itself is a mix of science fiction and supernatural!


                            'The Passage': Here's what to expect from the upcoming Fox series based on Justin Cronin's best-selling apocalyptic novel

With a plethora of young adult, dystopian future based novels being turned into on-screen adaptations, the concept can get a little been-there-done-that at times. Not with Fox's upcoming new show 'The Passage,' because the trailer itself reveals that this is going to be a unique joyride into the wilderness of science and technology. Based on Justin Cronin's best-selling book by the same name, the show's trailer, released a couple of months ago, brilliantly showcased the story about to unfold on screens. It also introduced viewers to 10-year-old Amy Bellanfonte who will be the show's "most important girl in the world." And while there's brewing speculation about how much of the book we are going to witness on screen, here's a little surprise: the story in itself is a mix of science fiction and supernatural!

Releasing January 14, 2019, the story revolves around Brad Wolgast (Mark-Paul Gosselaar), a federal agent who has been given the task of retrieving the young Amy (Saniyya Sydney) as she has been chosen to appear as a test subject for a risky medical trial called Project Noah. Now, here's the catch. In a very Spiderman plot like fashion, our initially good cop, Wolgast, goes bad, and accompanying him in this change of heart is the little Amy - with the duo standing against the world. Soon it draws the attention of the Feds, of course, and who is the man in charge of hunting the rogue duo down? Wolgast's former best friend Clark Richards (Vincent Piazza).

 

What's interesting about the plot is that Wolgast - even though he's going against the authorities - is actually doing what he's doing, with good intent. In his task to bring Amy to the research center, he gets protective of the child and starts acting like a father-figure of sorts. Along with the authorities, Project Noah actually poses a threat in the form of unleashing a deadly apocalypse on the planet. Oh, and the bonus points? Turns out the trial going wrong could accidentally create vampire-like superhumans with bloodthirst - and this amalgamation of science and technology with the supernatural genre has rarely been seen before!

Even then, it is somehow the elements of dystopia used in the book, that keeps readers hooked, and could potentially work the same way with the upcoming show too. Set in an apocalyptic world in the earth's near future, times are dark and dreary from the beginning of the story itself.

Book cover of Justin Cronin's The Passage. Source: The Passage website.
Book cover of Justin Cronin's The Passage. Source: The Passage website.

'The Passage starts off with America in crisis and under siege. Lifestyle is irrationally expensive, finances and morale depleted owing to exhaustive foreign wars, and with the country facing a vast divide, Cronin's world in 'The Passage' is riddled with terrorist attacks. Multiple hurricanes have also contributed to that, reducing certain states to swamps, but there's also a simultaneous invasion and breach of privacy as a state security apparatus has been interjected into the lives of every citizen. And it is this thick layer of fear and suspicion that the government takes advantage of by allowing malicious, unchecked federal power to go ahead with medical tests like Project Noah.

This might come off as very 'Hunger Games' type with the setting and inherent fear and distaste alike for the authority, but what sets 'The Passage' apart from most works of apocalyptic fiction is the supernatural side effects of Project Noah. And as the story progresses, it becomes clear that the medical experiment isn't entirely flawless. With Amy and her fellow subjects being brought onboard to test out the special virus, what they aren't warned about is the potential dark side effect of the treatment. 

A scene from the trailer of 'The Passage.' Source: Youtube screenshot.
A scene from the trailer of 'The Passage.' Source: Youtube screenshot.

As the official website points out, the creator of the project "believes that the virus, taken from a rare species of South American bat, is the source of the vampire legend. Through its interaction with the immune system, it has the power to fight virtually all diseases and radically lengthen the human life-span—a matter of great interest to the military, which hopes to use it to create a force of super soldiers."

Obviously, things take a much darker turn than anticipated, as the virus infiltrates the subjects with monstrous abilities, psychic powers, and bloodthirst, helping all of them break out of their confinement and wreak havoc upon all of Northern America. Yet somehow, Amy comes out of this unscathed and unaffected by any of the virus' side effects; and this is pretty much what sets off the sequence of events in the story as we will see in the upcoming Fox show.

Disclaimer : The views expressed in this article belong to the writer and are not necessarily shared by MEAWW.