'Ted Lasso' Review: Jason Sudeikis tickles the funny bone effortlessly in Apple TV's underdog sports comedy

In addition to a crisp storyline, there's some thigh-slapping humor, some heartening sequences and dollops of sporting action making it a fun watch


                            'Ted Lasso' Review: Jason Sudeikis tickles the funny bone effortlessly in Apple TV's underdog sports comedy
(Apple TV+)

This review contains spoilers

"Blimey, that's bloody hilarious" was the first thought after watching the pilot episode of 'Ted Lasso', Apple TV+'s new 30-minute, ten-episode comedy series. This is the second sports content Apple TV+ has dished since the 'Greatness Code' and by the end of the series, this is more than just a light-hearted piece of comedy. In addition to a crisp storyline, there's some thigh-slapping humor, some heartening sequences and dollops of sporting action making it a fun watch.

'Ted Lasso' can easily be termed as good comedy and had it been a full-length feature film, perhaps it would have worked even better. That said, the series doesn't disappoint either as the underdog theme works well with the plotline that's chosen. Jason Sudeikis and 'Scrubs' mastermind Bill Lawrence attempt to tell the story of an enthusiastic American football team coach, Ted Lasso (played by Sudeikis himself).

Life chugs merrily for Lasso when he coaches a Division II championship at Wichita State to a win until he's flown all the way to England to lead a rather average team filled with snobs. Premier League soccer team, AFC Richmond, owned by Rebecca (Hannah Waddingham), doesn't really welcome him with open arms and neither does the team or the journalists. Rebecca, of course, oozes of hypocrisy, so that makes Lasso oblivious to what he's stepping into. Her intentions are quite clear as she hopes to burn the team down to the ground as payback to her ex-husband for being a womanizer.

Anthony Head plays the husband and his love for AFC Richmond is immense. This also makes it a convenient weak spot for Rebecca to apply pressure on and she does so by roping in Lasso. And despite having zilch knowledge about the rules of the game, the ever-eager Lasso and his coaching mate and friend, Beard (Brendan Hunt) try and get to coach a bunch of nasty players to become a quality side. There is enough mockery and ill-treatment, and that just adds to us rooting for the lovable Lasso.

The supporting characters are equally fun to watch and impress each time they come on-screen. Brett Goldstein as grumpy but the talented Roy Kent, Jamie Tartt (Phil Dunster), Nick Mohammed as the timid Nathan who serves as the team's attendant slip into their roles seamlessly. The highlight of the series is the punchlines and the witty one-liners that are thrown in every now and then. As the series progresses, it is understandable why Apple looked at making this a ten-part series — Ted Lasso has a story to tell.

And he does so too as he the series also delves into the mindset of these characters. Lasso is a synonym for optimism. Chips are down? Chin up. Badly treated? Shrug it off. And there's something awfully sweet about him at the same time. So nice that one point, when a journalist is hired to do a bash piece on him by Rebecca, he admits although he would write the story, he would feel terrible later on.

With the coronavirus pandemic all but interrupting sports, there's never been more demand for content with sports as the primary theme. With that in mind, 'Ted Lasso' will be certainly viewed as it should. This is a feel-good story that at the end of the day leaves you with a pleasant smile and is worth the time.

'Ted Lasso' Episodes 1-3 are available for streaming on Apple TV+

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