'Facts of flatulence': Scientists reveal why people like the smell of their own farts and not others

'A sense of familiarity is also behind why we like our own farts more than others,' a report said based on a study by scientists

'Facts of flatulence': Scientists reveal why people like the smell of their own farts and not others
(Representational picture, Getty Images/ ljubaphoto)
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A new report has revealed that there is actually a scientific reason behind people liking the smell of their own farts but feeling disgusted over others. LADbible, citing a blind smell test by scientists, said, "It seems the bacteria that creates the pungent smell is unique to each person, and therefore becomes bearable to the individual over time.”

It also stated, "A sense of familiarity is also behind why we like our own farts more than others.This isn’t the same when someone else breaks wind and you happen to smell it. Your brain will detect something trying to harm you and set up defence mechanisms as a way of protection.”

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However, apart from these reasons, people on Twitter also have their own theories behind this strange phenomena. When NewScientist posted on Twitter earlier, “How is it that one’s own farts smell tolerable, but other people’s smell awful? How does the brain differentiate between the two?” users jumped into the reply section to give their valuable insights.

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A user shared, “When you fart you program your brain for incoming foul smell (setting high threshold for tolerance), so whatever comes in you can take it. While unanticipated fart from other feels horrible because of low threshold for tolerance. There you go.” A second user said, “One’s own farts generate an external vagal stimulation due to the homogeneous sensory nerve-plasticity. very similar to the internal link between the intestinal microbiome and vagal nerve in a way that microbial rhythm can tune up a vagal stimulation and create relaxation.”

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“For example: How is it that one’s own disadvantages are tolerable, but other people’s notacceptable? How does the brain differentiate between the two? :))” the third user described and the fourth one explained: “Your own farts might be the reminder of a good meal you've eaten... unless you've had a lot of red wine. Then I think they're intolerable to everyone, including you!”

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“Because we always love our own stuff 😂. Also smelling ours all the time makes us used to it just like our wives and even girlfriends 😉,” a person sarcastically tweeted. Another person commented, “Fart is the release if gassy smells from our digestive system. The nose is already ‘familiar’ with this smell, because these gases also bubble up to the mouth and nostrils,  this ‘familiarity’ makes one’s own fart soft in the blunt!”

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Another tweet read, “Brain considers persistent sense of smell as background. Only new smell over it sensed &reacted upon. Ever noticed people working in factories/areas with pungent smell not too impacted by it.” “Farting is like success, only your own smells sweet,” another tweet stated and a third one added, “The effect is similar to noise cancellation. When a person farts their body also releases an odour in their breath that chemically reacts with the fart to make it inert. This only effects the area around the head of the farter. This is why people who fart also have bad breath.”
This article contains remarks made on the Internet by individual people and organizations. MEAWW cannot confirm them independently and does not support claims or opinions being made online.

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