Monkeys snatch and throw 4-month-old boy off building roof, killing him in front of horrified dad

The parents along with the infant were on their rooftop on Friday, July 15, when several monkeys attacked them


                            Monkeys snatch and throw 4-month-old boy off building roof, killing him in front of horrified dad
An infant was killed by a group of monkeys who attacked him while he was with his parents (Photo by Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images)
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BAREILLY, INDIA: In a horrifying incident, a troop of wild monkeys in India stole a baby from his father and threw the boy from a third-story rooftop, killing him instantly. The infant's father, Nirdesh Upadhyay, 25, and his wife were on their rooftop with their four-month-old son on Friday, July 15, in Bareilly when several monkeys attacked them.

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Upadhyay's wife escaped the crazed monkeys, but the troop cornered him. He attempted to flee but dropped his son, allowing one of the animals to scoop him up and toss him off the rooftop, DNA India reported Sunday, July 17. The man, who was hit by the animals, cried out for help, but before other family members could arrive, the monkeys had snatched the baby boy and thrown him off the roof. The child died on the spot due to the animal attack

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The monkeys also attacked other family members when they reached the roof. According to the reports, the deceased infant had one sibling, seven years older than him. The family was preparing for his name-day ceremony before the mishap took place. Bareilly Chief Conservator of Forests Lalit Verma said the incident has been reported and a team of forest department has been sent to conduct a probe, the news outlet reported.

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Monkeys gathered on the side of the road eat bananas passed out by residents as India remains under an unprecedented lockdown over the highly contagious coronavirus (COVID-19) on April 08, 2020 in New Delhi, India. Wild animals, including monkeys, are roaming human settlements in India as people are staying indoors due to the 21-day lockdown. With India's 1.3 billion population and tens of millions of cars off the roads, wildlife is moving towards areas inhabited by humans. Wild animals in many countries have been seen roaming streets. A study says some 60 percent of the new diseases found around the globe every year are zoonotic, meaning they originate in animals and are passed on to humans. COVID-19 is a zoonotic disease that is suspected to have come from the wet markets of Wuhan, China. The monkeys had also hit the infant's father (Photo by Yawar Nazir/Getty Images)

Animal attacks on humans are a very common occurrence. Last week on July 14, a Minnesota zoo worker was bitten by a camel on the head that dragged him about 15 feet, officials said. The incident took place at the Hemker Park and Zoo near the city of Freeport, the Stearns County Sheriff’s Office said.

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The 32-year-old worker, identified as Roger Blencker, was escorting the camel through an alleyway to prepare it for transport to another facility when the animal bit down on his head. The camel dragged Blencker by his head for about 15 feet before a second employee, 32-year-old Seth Wickson, intervened and used a plastic walking board to pry open the animal's mouth. Blencker was able to stand alone and flee for safety.

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However, officials said the camel then charged Wickson and bit his head. Wickson was able to retreat to safety and declined medical attention. Blencker was airlifted to St Cloud Hospital. The zoo later said in an update that he sustained minor injuries that were non-life-threatening and was expected to make a full recovery. The camel was not injured during the incident and remains in good health, zoo officials said.

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