Matthew Coleman begs for 'forgiveness' after killing his 2 children as they had 'serpent DNA'

The 40-year-old California surf school owner penned the jailhouse letter to an unidentified friend four months after being charged with killing his two kids, Kaleo, 2, and 10-month-old Roxy


                            Matthew Coleman begs for 'forgiveness' after killing his 2 children as they had 'serpent DNA'
Matthew Talyor Coleman was influenced by Illuminati and QAnon conspiracy theories (Instagram/@matthewtaylorcoleman)

Matthew Taylor Coleman a father-of-four who became a QAnon conspiracy theorist and allegedly murdered two of his children with a spearfishing gun convinced that they had 'serpent DNA,' has written a letter to beg for forgiveness from the detention center that he is being held in before his trial. 

The 40-year-old California surf school owner penned the jailhouse letter to an unidentified friend four months after being charged with killing his two kids, Kaleo, 2, and 10-month-old Roxy, at a Christian ranch in Rosarito, Mexico on August 9. Coleman was indicted on first-degree murder charges in September. Since then, he has pleaded not guilty in a US District Court in San Diego in October. If convicted, Coleman is eligible for the death penalty. If he is not sentenced to death, Coleman's maximum sentence would be life in prison with a fine of up to $250,000. 

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'He poured out his heart'

Matthew Taylor Coleman with son Kaleo (Instagram @matthewtaylorcoleman)

Prior to the alleged murders, Coleman and his family had planned a vacation trip. Coleman was arrested upon his attempted return to the US after fleeing from the country by crossing the Southern border without his wife Abby's knowledge. "He's really despondent and hopeless," a close family friend told People Magazine. "He's alone with his thoughts 24/7. He's reflecting on the mistakes he made in life and wondering if there's any chance for redemption. He poured out his heart. He begged for forgiveness, but says that he's now where he deserves to be."

Following his arrest, "Coleman reportedly told federal authorities that 'he received visions and signs that his wife possessed serpent DNA and had passed it onto his children." He also added that he thought his children were "going to grow into monsters" since he believed they inherited this serpent DNA from their mother. And as a result he thought he was "saving the world" by ridding the world of them. 

Coleman was motivated by the "big tent QAnon conspiracy theory" that claims former President Donald Trump is secretly battling a shadowy cabal of Satan-worshipping Democratic pedophiles. He also confessed to the authorities that he used a spear-fishing gun to shoot Kaleo and Roxy in the heart before dumping them in a field outside Rosarito and returning to his hotel room, where the rest of his children were staying. 

Coleman's online engagement investigated 

Matthew Talyor Coleman thought he was saving the world. By killing his children. (Instagram/@matthewtaylorcoleman)

Coleman's electronic devices were seized by the FBI last month and they are in the process of going through his browser history and messages. "A computer, two phones, and an iPad are being searched pursuant to warrants," the motion reads. "Instead of waiting until agents have completed the searches and providing only data seized as responsive to the warrants, a mirror image of the computer's entire drive and the full Cellebrite downloads for the phones and iPad will be provided to the defense by Nov 5, 2021. By that date, the United States also will provide additional discovery consisting generally of cell site data, Mexican law enforcement reports, photographs and recordings of or from the area of the murders, jail recordings, and videos from the Port of Entry."

One of the focuses of the investigation is also Coleman's online engagement on groups and message boards that talk about QAnon conspiracy theories. "Agents are seeing what he read but we're more interested in what he wrote about his beliefs and whether they had any influence over his actions in August," a law enforcement source close to People said.

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