Johnny Depp Vs Amber Heard: MOST fake Twitter accounts posting SUPPORT for actress

A new study says that almost 11% of Twitter accounts posting about the ongoing trial on the social media platform are fake


                            Johnny Depp Vs Amber Heard: MOST fake Twitter accounts posting SUPPORT for actress
Actors Amber Heard (L) and Johnny Depp attend the 27th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala at Palm Springs Convention Center on January 2, 2016, in Palm Springs, California (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

While Johnny Depp and Amber Heard’s blockbuster drama is unfolding in a Virginia court, a new study says that almost 11% of Twitter accounts posting about it on the social media platform are fake. It has also been reported that most of those fake accounts sided with the ‘Aquaman’ actress while tarnishing the image of Depp.

The study has been carried out by Cyabra — a company that “believes in bringing authenticity to the digital realm, offering a lens of truth to filter through the noise” — which checked 2,300 Twitter profiles. The firm’s CEO Dan Brahmy told Fox News Digital, “Whenever there's a lot of people involved, there's always going to be some level of additional, inauthentic conversation going on around a topic,” as he explained that the intention behind it's “usually…about drawing financial interest, or some sort of status or political interest.”

READ MORE

Elon Musk and James Franco DECLINE to testify in Johnny Depp-Amber Heard trial

Inside the sordid and steamy SEX LIFE of Johnny Depp and Amber Heard

It has been said that the researchers who analyzed those 2,300 accounts checked a few parameters to determine if they were genuine, like “users they are interacting with, what material users post or engage with, what time they share content and so on.” Brahmy went on to say: “The average of inauthenticity usually ranges between 3% to 5%,” before noting: “We didn't just analyze Johnny Depp as a word and Amber Heard as another word because it would be difficult to skim through [that] data efficiently.”

Actors Amber Heard (L) and Johnny Depp attend the 27th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala at Palm Springs Convention Center on January 2, 2016, in Palm Springs, California. (Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Reports said that the company examined hashtags, like #IStandWithAmberHeard, #BoycottJohnnyDepp, #JusticeForJohnnyDepp, and more to find the authenticity of the accounts that were quite active between March 13 and April 16. Rafi Mendelsohn, Cyabra's vice president of marketing, said: “It was previously pretty unlikely that we thought we'd be having a conversation about misinformation when it comes to a Johnny Depp topic. Elections, yes. Wars, yes. But actually, now, when it comes to celebrity topics…we're finding ourselves were looking at topics, more and more, covering everyday celebrity topics.”

The VP of the organization added: “We can now pretty confidently say that there isn't a topic in the news at the moment…or any topic that's being discussed on social media that isn't being touched by the challenge and the issue of disinformation and fake profiles propagating and having an impact on the conversation in a negative way.”

Spectators showing support for Johnny Depp And Amber Heard outside of Fairfax County Circuit Court on April 11, 2022 in Fairfax, Virginia. Depp is seeking $50 million in alleged damages to his career over an op-ed Heard wrote in the Washington Post in 2018. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images)

The current face off between Depp and his former wife is the result of a 2018 op-ed written for The Washington Post, which was written by Heard. In the piece, she had claimed herself to be domestic violence survivor while mentioning: “Like many women, I had been harassed and sexually assaulted by the time I was of college age. But I kept quiet — I did not expect filing complaints to bring justice. And I didn’t see myself as a victim. Then two years ago, I became a public figure representing domestic abuse, and I felt the full force of our culture’s wrath for women who speak out.”

Johnny Depp and Amber Heard attend the premiere of Focus Features' "The Danish Girl" at Westwood Village Theatre on November 21, 2015, in Westwood, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

The ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ star’s legal team took offense to the op-ed and sued Heard for $50 million. But the 36-year-old filed a countersuit against her ex-husband and demanded $100 million.

If you have an entertainment scoop or a story for us, please reach out to us on (323) 421-7515