Who is Quinn? Nonbinary trans soccer player creates history by winning Olympic gold

While Quinn helped Canada take home the bronze at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro, they did not come out as trans and nonbinary until last year


                            Who is Quinn? Nonbinary trans soccer player creates history by winning Olympic gold
Quinn poses with their gold medal during the women's soccer competition medal ceremony on August 06, 2021 in Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan (Photo by Naomi Baker/Getty Images)

A Canadian soccer player who only goes by the mononym Quinn has made Olympic history. In Tokyo, the Canadian women's soccer team took home the gold on Friday, August 6, beating out Sweden and earning the top spot for the first time in their Olympic history. With the win, midfielder Quinn became the first-ever openly transgender and nonbinary athlete to win gold in the Olympic Games.

After the semi-final win against the United States Women's National Team, Quinn said that they had been "getting messages from young people saying they've never seen a trans person in sports before." They said, "athletics is the most exciting part of my life and it brings me the most joy. If I can allow kids to play the sports they love, that's my legacy and that's what I'm here for."

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While Quinn helped Canada take home the bronze at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro, they did not come out as trans and nonbinary until last year. "I feel proud seeing 'Quinn' up on the lineup and on my accreditation," they said. "I feel sad knowing there were Olympians before me unable to live their truth because of the world. I feel optimistic for change. Change in the legislature. Changes in rules, structures, and mindsets."

"Mostly, I feel aware of the realities. Trans girls being banned from sports. Trans women facing discrimination and bias while trying to pursue their Olympic dreams," they said further. "The fight isn't close to over... and I'll celebrate when we're all here."

NPR reported that in terms of LGBTQ representation, the Tokyo Games have been huge. Nonbinary skateboarder Alana Smith competed for the US during the Games. BMX had trans representation through rider Chelsea Wolfe, who also competed for the United States. Laurel Hubbard, a weightlifter from New Zealand, became the first transgender woman to compete in an individual event.



 

As per a CNN report, Quinn's mother ​Linda played basketball at the University of Waterloo in Canada, while their father Bill played rugby at the University of Western Ontario. Quinn, who plays for Seattle OL Reign in the NWSL, made their debut for Canada in 2014.

Speaking about coming out as transgender earlier, Quinn said: “I wanted to be my authentic self in all spheres of my life and one of those is being in a public space. So that was one of the reasons behind it, because I was tired of being misgendered and everything like that.”

They also said, “I am considered maybe one of the most digestible versions of what it means to be trans. I'm White, I'm trans-masculine. I want my story to be told because when we have lots of trans visibility that's where we start making a movement and start making gains in society.” After coming out, Quinn expressed disappointment after the media used their three-word birth name and said: “It's crucial to write about trans people using their names and pronouns.”

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.