Forget Sharknado, it's a SHARKCANO! Massive plumes discharge from Kavachi, home to MUTANT sharks

NASA recently released satellite photos of the Kavachi Volcano, which is located near the ‘Sharkcano’ crater where mutant sharks are found to thrive


                            Forget Sharknado, it's a SHARKCANO! Massive plumes discharge from Kavachi, home to MUTANT sharks
NASA and the US Geological Survey satellite Landsat obtained an image that shows massive plumes of water from the ‘Sharkcano’ crater due to volcanic eruption (Photo by Smithsonian Institution and US Geological Survey and Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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NASA recently released satellite photos of the Kavachi Volcano, which is located near the Solomon Islands in the Pacific, east of New Guinea, spouting massive plumes of water from the ‘Sharkcano’ crater. The crater was dubbed ‘sharkcano’ because of the large number of sharks that live in the hot, acidic water. On May 19, Nasa and the US Geological Survey satellite Landsat obtained an image that Nasa's Earth Observatory posted. According to NASA Earth Observatory, a team of National Geographic researchers was startled to discover two kinds of sharks, including hammerheads, surviving and flourishing in the hot, acidic, sulfur-laden water in the crater, which is located deep in the ocean, in 2015.

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The researchers observed bluefin trevally, snapper, sixgill stingrays, jellyfish, and silky sharks living in this extreme environment using a baited drop camera nearly 150 feet inside the crater, according to a 2016 Oceanography article titled "Exploring the 'Sharkcano': Biogeochemical observations of the Kavachi submarine volcano (Solomon Islands)." Scientists believe the sharks have to evolve in order to live in such a hot and corrosive environment. 

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Meanwhile, Kavachi which is also known as Rejo te Kvachi, or Kavachi's Oven, is one of the most active undersea volcanoes in the Pacific. Since the late 1970s, there have been at least 11 major eruptions, two of which in 1976 and 1991 were so powerful that they formed new islands. These islands, however, were not large enough to withstand erosion and eventually submerged. According to the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program, the volcano began erupting in October 2021. The NASA Earth Observatory said that NASA published satellite photographs of the volcano erupting on May 14, revealing discolored water near the volcano many times between April and May 2022. Other big eruptions at Kavachi occurred in 2007 and 2014. It erupted for the first time in 1939.

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Volcanoes, on the other hand, may be unexpected in terms of when they erupt and how long they continue. The new development of the Kavachi Volcano comes after a massive undersea volcano in Tonga, the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai, erupted this year with explosive forces comparable to up to 30 million tonnes of TNT and a hundred times greater than Hiroshima's atomic bomb. When the volcano erupted on January 15, it sprayed debris up to 25 miles into the atmosphere.  It caused a 7.4 magnitude earthquake, which sent tsunami waves slamming into the island, covering it in ash and cutting it off from outside assistance.

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