Video of Afghan girl weeping as Taliban seize control goes viral: ‘We'll die slowly’

The heart-rending clip, first shared by Khaled Hosseini, Afghan-American novelist, and then retweeted by activist Masih Alinejad has already garnered 1.6 million views


                            Video of Afghan girl weeping as Taliban seize control goes viral: ‘We'll die slowly’
Screenshots of the viral video of an Afghan girl (Twitter/ Khaled Hosseini)

A video of a crying girl from Afghanistan has gone viral on the Internet as she shares her fears after the Taliban captures major cities of her nation. The heart-rending clip, first shared by Khaled Hosseini, Afghan-American novelist and humanitarian, and then retweeted by human rights activist Masih Alinejad has already garnered 1.6 million views.

In the video, the unidentified girl can be heard saying, “We don't count because we were born in Afghanistan. I cannot help crying. I have to wipe my tears to be able to film this video. No one cares about us. We'll die slowly in history. Isn’t it funny?”

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Afghans wait in long lines for hours at the passport office as many are desperate to have their travel documents ready to go on August 14, 2021 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Tensions are high as the Taliban advance on the capital city after taking the major cities of Herat, Mazar-e Sharif, and the country's second-largest city Kandahar. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

 

Netizens from across the world, including the US, couldn’t control themselves after seeing her anguished lament about the world's response to her country. A user tweeted, “This is a hard to watch video it shows her raw emotions at her fate made real by events outside her control.” The second user wrote, “So sorry, that this broken world has failed to keep you beautiful women and children safe & protected. I know that I can’t do much, and I can only offer my LOVE & SUPPORT, in this moment. I am nobody special BUT I CARE ABOUT THIS & I CARE ABOUT YOU, as well as generations to come.” “It's heart-breaking to see her crying and the fake laugh at the end makes it worst. Hopefully the Taliban will get their minds out of the gutter and help the world out instead of ruining it. Poor girl,” the third one added.



 

 



 

 



 

A person even asked, “How can we sponsor Afghan women to come to the United States?” Another one said, “It is heartbreaking- to not have the choice and opportunity to live a life they way they want to as women. For children’s futures to be stolen- for every life lost and ruined in the chaos and lack of opportunities, it is a disgrace.” “To the women of Afghanistan:  Get out of that cesspool of a country ASAP.  Go to Mexico.  From there the U.S. Southern border is wide open allowing anybody in w/no masks, vaccinations or I.D. credentials.  Leave your men behind; we have better ones here,” a user suggested.

Displaced Afghans from the northern provinces are evacuated from a makeshift IDP camp in Share-e-Naw park to various mosques and schools on August 12, 2021 in Kabul, Afghanistan. People displaced by the Taliban advancing are flooding into the Kabul capital to escape the Taliban takeover of their provinces. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)


 



 



 

A tweet read, “I do not understand how after 20 years in Afghanistan, with the progress that has been made, the West & the @UN can just turn their backs on the people, allowing the Taliban to march back in. This *will* be seen as a terrible mistake, with consequences for our security, in future.” “So painful and distressing! The ordinary Afghan ppl especially the girls and women are suffering a lot. Very bad for humanity and the kind people there. USA couldn't do anything and they failed the world community too. I believe Pakistan is the real culprit and major bad player,” another tweet added.



 



 

The video comes as United Nations’ Secretary-General António Guterres released a statement on August 13, saying, “I have just returned to New York and would like to speak to you about the grave situation in Afghanistan. Even [for] a country that has tragically known generations of conflict, Afghanistan is in the throes of yet another chaotic and desperate chapter – an incredible tragedy for its long-suffering people.”

He noted, “Afghanistan is spinning out of control. In the last month alone, more than 1,000 people have been killed or injured from indiscriminate attacks against civilians, notably in Helmand, Kandahar and Herat provinces. The fighting between the Taliban and Afghan security forces in urban environments is causing tremendous harm. At least 241,000 people have been forced to flee from their homes. Humanitarian needs are growing by the hour.”

Farzia, 28, who lost her husband in Baghlan one week ago to fighting by the Taliban sits with her children, Subhan, 5, and Ismael ,2, in a tent at a makeshift IDP camp in Share-e-Naw park to various mosques and schools on August 12, 2021 in Kabul, Afghanistan. People displaced by the Taliban advancing are flooding into the Kabul capital to escape the Taliban takeover of their provinces. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Guterres also pointed out how the crisis is drastically affecting women and children. He added, “Every day, the conflict is taking an even bigger toll on women and children. Continued urban conflict will mean continued carnage — with civilians paying the highest price. I call on all parties to take heed of the conflict's heavy toll and its devastating impact on civilians. They all must do more to protect civilians. Perpetrators must be held accountable. I am also deeply disturbed by early indications that the Taliban are imposing severe restrictions on human rights in the areas under their control, particularly targeting women and journalists. It is particularly horrifying and heartbreaking to see reports of the hard-won rights of Afghan girls and women being ripped away from them.”

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